Conor McPherson

Over the last three years, Dublin, Ireland, writer Conor McPherson, 28, has made an international name for himself as a playwright, using monologues and soliloquies to weave complex tales of sorrowful but also soulful Irish lives.

With “The Weir,” he introduced something new into his writing — namely, dialogue — and found himself with a West End and Broadway hit that remains the most successful play to date in Royal Court Theatre history.

His next play, “Dublin Carol,” will open at the Court on Feb. 17 after a preview engagement at the Old Vic.

Nonetheless, these days it’s the film world that is dominating his time, having dipped a toe in the water scripting “I Went Down,” an Irish comedy that was a serious homegrown hit.

“I like showing stories using actors, and so doing it on film is not really that much of a different universe,” says McPherson, whose directorial debut “Saltwater,” adapted from his play “This Lime Tree Bower,” co-stars Brendan Gleeson and Brian Cox, and will bow in Berlin’s Panorama lineup. “It’s still drama, you know.”

On Jan. 24, he began directing a feature film at Ardmore Studios of Beckett’s merciless play “Endgame,” starring Michael Gambon and David Thewlis: the project is a Channel 4-RTE-Irish Film Board co-venture under the auspices of Dublin’s Gate Theatre.

And skedded for an April-May launch is the tentatively titled “Actors’ Project,” which fellow Irishman Neil Jordan brought to McPherson to write and then to direct. A Company of Wolves project for DreamWorks, the film is a comedy based on an unfinished novel by Jordan.

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