Review: ‘The Corndog Man’

Second indie feature by Andrew Shea ("Santa Fe") works primarily as a showcase for Noble Willingham's ferociously effective performance as a foul-mouthed, fierce-tempered redneck who's gradually unhinged by blasts from his past. Despite limitations of scope and repetitiveness of dialogue, "The Corndog Man" may generate interest in global homevid and TV venues after a spin on the fest circuit.

Second indie feature by Andrew Shea (“Santa Fe”) works primarily as a showcase for Noble Willingham’s ferociously effective performance as a foul-mouthed, fierce-tempered redneck who’s gradually unhinged by blasts from his past. Despite limitations of scope and repetitiveness of dialogue, “The Corndog Man” may generate interest in global homevid and TV venues after a spin on the fest circuit.

By turns monstrous and pathetic, abrasive and defensive, Willingham’s Ace Barker is introduced as the best salesman at a small-town South Carolina boat dealership. His world starts to fall apart when he receives a phone call from an unseen stranger (co-scriptwriter Jim Holmes) who claims to be a potential customer. Over time, however, the caller emerges a hectoring stalker, repeatedly reminding the redneck of his cowardly betrayal of a black friend during their Army stint many years earlier. Revelations of past and current sexual improprieties are slow in coming, and far short of unpredictable. A few minor supporting players drift through “Corndog Man,” but pic basically is a two-hander that could easily be adapted into a stage play. Tech credits are average.

The Corndog Man

(DRAMA)

Production

A Corndog Prods. presentation of a Doradel Pictures production. Produced by Jim Holmes, David Steen, Andrew Shea. Executive producers, Kjehl Rasmussen, James J. Melino. Directed, edited by Andrew Shea. Screenplay, Shea, David Steen, Jim Holmes. Camera (color), David Bridges; music supervisor, Elliot Easton; production designer, Rusty Smith; costume designer, Karen Keyes. Reviewed at Sundance Film Festival (American Spectrum), Jan. 22, 1999. (Also in Berlin Film Festival.) Running time: 83 MIN.

With

With: Noble Willingham, Jim Holmes.

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  1. One of the funniest of the 90’s

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