D'Works pic leads pack with six noms

A “Beauty” indeed.

DreamWorks’ “American Beauty” paced the Golden Globes derby with six nominations, which were announced Monday by the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. “Beauty” was trailed closely by “The Insider” and “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” with five each, and “Being John Malkovich” and “The End of the Affair,” which scored four nods.

As was expected in a year where there’s no dominant film (as occurred two years ago with “Titanic”), the nominations were spread over a large number of pics. Thirty-six movies received noms, with 18 getting one each — almost exactly the same numbers as last year, when there was also no clear front-runner.

“It’s still an open field,” said one studio exec. “And the smaller films are still in contention.”

On the television side, HBO led the field with 18 noms, fueled by series “The Sopranos” and “Sex and the City,” with five apiece. 20th Century Fox TV led all prod’n studios with eight nods.The Globes are divided almost equally between films (13 categories) and TV (11). Due to the awards’ proximity to the Oscars, the film categories often get much more attention, since they are seen as bellwethers to the Academy Awards.

However, the Globe-Oscar correlation is spotty. Last year, many GG nominees also went on to Oscar bids; but, only four of 13 Globe winners went on to win an Academy Award. (The two male acting Globe winners, Jim Carrey for “Truman Show” and Michael Caine for “Little Voice,” didn’t even get Oscar nominations.)

That low batting average is typical in years like 1999, when there are no clear frontrunners. For the years of “Titanic” and “Forrest Gump,” on the other hand, the correlation is much higher.

Completely absent from Globe noms was the year’s biggest box office bonanza, “Star Wars: Episode 1: The Phantom Menace,” which has raked in $918.2 million worldwide. B.O. runnerup “The Sixth Sense” ($452 million globally) nabbed two noms.

Also ignored were such year-end award hopefuls as “Any Given Sunday,” “Cradle Will Rock,” “Ride With the Devil,” “Snow Falling on Cedars,” “Topsy-Turvy” and “Titus.”

Nabbing only one bid apiece were “Angela’s Ashes,” “Anywhere But Here,” “Eyes Wide Shut” and “The Green Mile,” while “Anna and the King” scored two, both in music categories.

In general, these films have also been bypassed by critics groups so far. Their Oscar momentum thus hits a speed bump, since kudos from critics and the Globes are attention-getters — a way of alerting Oscar voters to see these films before filling their ballots.

Such a leg-up could prove especially helpful this year, when there is such a glut of year-end openers, with no clear-cut shoo-ins in the major categories.

On the other hand, they shouldn’t give up hope: Last year’s eventual best-pic winner, “Shakespeare in Love,” won a Globe, but was pretty much ignored in the critics’ voting.

One studio exec said “Sony should put money behind ‘End of the Affair.’ Clearly it has momentum.”

Bob Levin, worldwide marketing prexy at Sony Picture Entertainment, said the Golden Globes have an impact on the box office domestically. “It has a direct value on the box office in the U.S.; internationally, it makes exhibitors aware of the film,” since the awards show in January may coincide with international release of some of the nominated pics.

“If you have a movie for which you are planning a slow rollout, the recognition certainly helps heighten awareness, as with ‘The End of the Affair.’ If you are absent, you have a much harder row to hoe because you have so many films surrounding you.”

The Globes divide film, lead actor and lead actress contenders into separate dramatic and comedy/musical categories. With noms in both dramatic and comedy categories, Julianne Moore is a double nominee, for “Affair” and “An Ideal Husband,” respectively.

“I’m having a good day,” said Moore who spoke to Daily Variety from New York. “But it’s putting me way behind in my Christmas-present wrapping. That was my plan for the day.”

Also a double nominee is Jack Lemmon, competing against himself for two lead roles in miniseries/telepic: “Inherit the Wind” and “Oprah Winfrey Presents: Tuesdays With Morrie.”

Back on the film side, “American Beauty” will compete for best drama with “The Insider,” “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” “The Hurricane” and “The End of the Affair.”

For comedy/musical, the nominees are “Analyze This,” “Being John Malkovich,” “Man on the Moon,” “Notting Hill” and “Toy Story 2.”

In the director race, the Globes live up to their international mandate: of the five competitors, only one is American-born (Michael Mann, “The Insider”). Also in the race are Canada, Ireland and the U.K.

Aside from Mann, best director nods went to Norman Jewison for “The Hurricane,” Neil Jordan for “The End of the Affair,” Sam Mendes for “American Beauty,” and Anthony Minghella for “The Talented Mr. Ripley.”

None has received a Globe before, though Jewison has been nominated for best director for “Fiddler on the Roof” and “In the Heat of the Night.” Jordan got a nod for the “Mona Lisa” screenplay; and Minghella was nominated for directing and writing the screenplay for “The English Patient.” Neither Mann or Mendes has been nominated before.

In London, Jordan Monday said, “I was surprised, but I’m mostly happy, really. It’s quite a complicated movie. As a director, you look for material that places demands on you and that stretches the medium, but it’s hard to find a place in the market for films like that. The whole awards circus is very important for non-mainstream moves and independent films.”

Tube ties

The TV nominations welcomed a lot of newcomers. In the races for drama and comedy series, half of the nominations are new. Repeating their bids from last year are two dramas — NBC’s “ER” and ABC’s “The Practice” — and three comedies: Fox’s “Ally McBeal,” ABC’s “Dharma and Greg” and ABC’s “Spin City.”

They are joined by ABC’s “Once and Again,” HBO’s “The Sopranos” and NBC’s “West Wing,” all dramas, and HBO’s “Sex and the City” and NBC’s “Will & Grace.”

Aside from the heavy “Sex” and “Sopranos” showings, other series made a big impact for the first time. NBC’s “Will and Grace” scored four noms and fall freshmen “Once and Again” (ABC) and “West Wing” (NBC) had three apiece.

“ER” (NBC) nabbed two noms, half of last year’s tally. ABC’s “Dharma and Greg” scored three, down one from last year. Also dropping one were two David E. Kelley shows, Fox’s “Ally McBeal” and ABC’s “The Practice” with two each this year.

Gaining one from last year was ABC’s “Spin City” with three noms, including one for Heather Locklear.

Past faves such as “Frasier,” “3rd Rock From the Sun,” “The X-Files” and “Law and Order” were absent from the list.

In the TV supporting-thesp races, the Globes mix series, miniseries and vidpics. Each of the two categories, supporting actor and actress, were evenly split between series and longforms, with three noms going in each direction. Of the 12 contenders in those two categories, the only repeat from last year is David Spade, of NBC’s “Just Shoot Me.”

In the longform race, NBC’s miniseries “Joan of Arc” led the charge with four noms. HBO’s vidpics “Introducing Dorothy Dandridge” and “RKO 182″ and A&E’s “Dash & Lilly” took home three bids apiece, followed by two each for HBO’s “Witness Protection” and Showtime’s “The Passion of Ayn Rand.”

“Lilly” director Kathy Bates also was nominated for her acting turn in ABC’s “Annie.”

The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. is comprised of 82 L.A.-based members.

Armyan Bernstein — a producer, writer of “Hurricane” and chairman of Beacon Communications — said, “Everybody I know watches the Golden Globes. It’s a show everybody has come to love. It’s not unnoticed what an impact they have on box office and Academy Award voting. They have come into a prominent position.”

As for the growing importance of the Globes, Jordan said, “We live in a world where Hollywood dominates everything, don’t we? Over the last four or five years, people around the world have become so aware of this: People everywhere know box office grosses! So the Golden Globes have become more and more and more important.”

Sony’s Levin added, “A long time ago, it would be an easy ticket to get seats for the Golden Globes. There was a cynicism in the industry about the awards. Now everyone shows up, and it is a tough ticket. There continues to be harping, but I think they have gained a lot of respect.”

The Golden Globe telecast will be held at the Beverly Hilton on Sunday, Jan. 23. It will be broadcast live on NBC. The show is produced by Dick Clark Prods. in association with the HFPA.

Here is a complete list of film and television nominees:

FILM

BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

“American Beauty”

“The End of the Affair”

“The Hurricane”

“The Insider”

“The Talented Mr. Ripley”

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Annette Bening (“American Beauty”)

Julianne Moore (“The End of the Affair”)

Meryl Streep (“Music of the Heart”)

Hilary Swank (“Boys Don’t Cry”)

Sigourney Weaver (“A Map of the World”)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Russell Crowe (“The Insider”)

Matt Damon (“The Talented Mr. Ripley”)

Richard Farnsworth (“The Straight Story”)

Kevin Spacey (“American Beauty”)

Denzel Washington (“The Hurricane”)

BEST MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

“Analyze This”

“Being John Malkovich”

“Man on the Moon”

“Notting Hill”

“Toy Story 2″

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Janet McTeer (“Tumbleweeds”)

Julianne Moore (“An Ideal Husband”)

Julia Roberts (“Notting Hill”)

Sharon Stone (“The Muse”)

Reese Witherspoon (“Election”)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

Jim Carrey (“Man on the Moon”)

Robert DeNiro (“Analyze This”)

Rupert Everett (“An Ideal Husband”)

Hugh Grant (“Notting Hill”)

Sean Penn (“Sweet and Lowdown”)

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

“Aimee & Jaguar”

“All About My Mother”

“East-West”

“Girl on the Bridge” (“La fille sur le pont”)

“The Red Violin”

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

Cameron Diaz (“Being John Malkovich”)

Angelina Jolie (“Girl, Interrupted”)

Catherine Keener (“Being John Malkovich”)

Samantha Morton (“Sweet And Lowdown”)

Natalie Portman (“Anywhere But Here”)

Chloe Sevigny (“Boys Don’t Cry”)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

Michael Caine (“The Cider House Rules”)

Tom Cruise (“Magnolia”)

Michael Clarke Duncan (“The Green Mile”)

Jude Law (“The Talented Mr. Ripley”)

Haley Joel Osment (“The Sixth Sense”)

BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

Norman Jewison (“The Hurricane”)

Neil Jordan (“The End of the Affair”)

Michael Mann (“The Insider”)

Sam Mendes (“American Beauty”)

Anthony Minghella (“The Talented Mr. Ripley”)

BEST SCREENPLAY

“American Beauty,” Alan Ball

“Being John Malkovich,” Charlie

Kaufman

“The Cider House Rules,” John Irving

The Insider,” Eric Roth & Michael Mann

“The Sixth Sense,” M. Night Shyamalan

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

“American Beauty,” Thomas Newman

“Angela’s Ashes,” John Williams

“Anna and the King,” George Fenton

“The End of the Affair,” Michael Nyman

“Eyes Wide Shut,” Jocelyn Pook

“The Insider,” Lisa Gerraro & Pieter

Bourke

“The Legend of 1900,” Ennio Morricone

“The Straight Story,” Angelo

Badalamenti

“The Talented Mr. Ripley,” Gabriel

Yared

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

“Beautiful Stranger” from “Austin

Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me,”

Madonna and William Orbit

“How Can I Not Love You” from “Anna

and the King,” Kenneth Edmonds,

George Fenton & Robert Kraft

“Save Me” from “Magnolia,” Aimee

Mann

“When She Loved Me” from “Toy Story

2,” Randy Newman

“You’ll Be In My Heart” from “Tarzan,”

Phil Collins

TELEVISION:

BEST SERIES (DRAMA)

“ER”

“Once & Again”

“The Practice”

“The Sopranos”

“The West Wing”

BEST ACTOR (DRAMA SERIES)

Billy Campbell (“Once and Again”)

James Gandolfini (“The

Soparanos”)

Rob Lowe (“The West Wing”)

Dylan McDermott (“The Practice”)

Martin Sheen (“The West Wing”)

BEST ACTRESS (DRAMA SERIES)

Lorraine Bracco (“The Sopranos”)

Amy Brenneman (“Judging Amy”)

Edie Falco (“The Sopranos”)

Julianna Margulies (“ER”)

Sela Ward (“Once & Again”)

BEST SERIES (COMEDY/MUSICAL)

“Ally McBeal”

“Dharma & Greg”

“Sex and the City”

“Spin City”

“Will & Grace”

BEST ACTOR (COMEDY/MUSICAL SERIES)

Michael J. Fox (“Spin City”)

Thomas Gibson (“Dharma &

Greg”)

Eric McCormack (“Will & Grace”)

Ray Romano (“Everybody Loves

Raymond”)

George Segal (“Just Shoot Me”)

BEST ACTRESS (COMEDY/MUSICAL SERIES)

Jenna Elfman (“Dharma & Greg”)

Calista Flockhart (“Ally McBeal”)

Felicity Huffman (“Sports Night”)

Heather Locklear (“Spin City”)

Debra Messing (“Will & Grace”)

Sarah Jessica Parker (“Sex and

the City”)

BEST MINISERIES OR TV MOVIE

“Dash and Lilly”

“Introducing Dorothy Dandridge”

“Joan of Arc”

“RKO 281″

“Witness Protection”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR (SERIES, MINISERIES OR TV MOVIE)

Klaus Maria Brandauer

(“Introducing Dorothy Dandridge”)

Peter Fonda (“Passion of Ayn

Rand”)

Sean P. Hayes (“Will & Grace”)

Chris Noth (“Sex and the City”)

Peter O’Toole (“Joan of Arc”)

David Spade (“Just Shoot Me”)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS (SERIES, MINISERIES OR TV MOVIE)

Kathy Bates (“Annie”)

Jacqueline Bissett (“Joan of Arc”)

Kim Cattrall (“Sex and the City”)

Melanie Griffith (“RKO 281″)

Nancy Marchand (“The Sopranos”)

Cynthia Nixon (“Sex and the City”)

Miranda Richardson (“The Big

Brass Ring”)

BEST ACTOR (MINISERIES OR TV MOVIE)

Jack Lemmon (“Inherit the Wind”)

Jack Lemmon (“Oprah Winfrey

Presents: Tuesdays With Morrie”)

Liev Schreiber (“RKO 281″)

Sam Shepard (“Dash and Lilly”)

Tom Sizemore (“Witness

Protection”)

BEST ACTRESS (MINISERIES OR TV MOVIE)

Halle Berry (“Introducing Dorothy

Dandridge”)

Judy Davis (“Dash and Lilly”)

Mia Farrow (“Forget Me Never”)

Helen Mirren (“Passion of Ayn

Rand”)

Leelee Sobieski (“Joan of Arc”)

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