Pic nabs 14 noms, tying 'Eve' for Acad record

After breaking speed records at the box office, “Titanic” sailed into the Oscar record books Tuesday with 14 nominations, tying 1950’s “All About Eve” for the most noms ever. (Only five films, from “Gone With the Wind” through “Forrest Gump,” have nabbed 13.)

Though many in the media last year announced that the domination of indie films would be a permanent trend in Oscar voting, the majors bounced back with a vengeance in the 70th annual Academy Awards.

Following “Titanic” (released domestically by Paramount and overseas by 20th Century Fox) were Warner Bros.’ “L.A. Confidential” and Miramax’s “Good Will Hunting,” with nine apiece. All three of the films are competing for best pic, a race that also includes Fox Searchlight’s “The Full Monty” (with four noms) and TriStar’s “As Good As it Gets” (with seven).

Directors of the first four pics — James Cameron, Curtis Hanson, Gus Van Sant and Peter Cattaneo — were also nominated. Acad voters bypassed “Gets” helmer James L. Brooks in favor of Atom Egoyan (“The Sweet Hereafter”). All five are first-timers in this category. Though Brooks’ exclusion will raise the inevitable “Did the film direct itself?” speculations, the Acad has only been five-for-five on directors and pics three times in 70 years.

Other notable noms: Jack Nicholson chalked up his 11th acting bid for “As Good,” putting him behind only Katharine Hepburn (with 12). “Titanic” supporting-actress contender Gloria Stuart at 87 becomes the oldest acting nominee ever, while she and best-actress nominee Kate Winslet mark the first time two thesps have been nominated for playing the same character in one year.

Woody Allen got a lucky 13th writing bid for “Deconstructing Harry,” giving him a record in that category (he’d formerly shared it with Billy Wilder); composer John Williams grabbed a whopping 36th bid, for his “Amistad” score. Jerry Goldsmith, with 15 previous bids (and one win) took home his 16th, for the “L.A. Confidential” score.

The best-pic roster runs the budget gamut, from the $3.5 million “Monty” to the $200 mil “Titanic.” “Monty” is the closest thing this year to a carry-over of last year’s small-scale roster. At the opposite end of the scale is “Titanic,” the biggest movie of all time: the biggest budget, the biggest special effects, and it’s heading toward the biggest B.O.

The period romance was nominated in every technical category, and could have beaten “Eve’s” record if Leonardo DiCaprio had landed in the crowded actor field, or if Cameron had gotten a screenplay bid. Even without that, Cameron got three noms: as producer, director, and one of the editors of the pic.

The mainstreaming trend is also evident in the actors race. Aside from Nicholson, contenders are Damon, Robert Duvall (“The Apostle”), Peter Fonda (“Ulee’s Gold”) and Dustin Hoffman (“Wag the Dog”). The characters are flawed and neurotic, but none is nearly as extreme as those in last year’s race (a deeply troubled pianist, a wheelchair-bound pornographer, a yokel with mental retardation and a severely burned nobleman).

The other three actors races include a similarly viewer-friendly (though wildly divergent) group. The characters include a president, a British queen and a porno queen, a waitress, a math genius, an obsessive-compulsive writer, a gay artist, a shrink, a film producer and a hooker. But after two blacks nominated last year, there are no minority actors repped in any of the four contests this year.

Despite the trend toward mainstreaming, the Acad voters weren’t particularly impressed with the top-10 pics at the box office last year, with the notable exception of “Titanic.” The other pics accounted for only eight noms, all in below-the-line categories.

Here’s how some of the other races are shaping up.

FILM

In the best pic race, “Titanic” seems to have the edge: the film with the most nominations has gone on to win the best-pic prize in 21 of the past 25 years, and it’s hard to ignore the record-high tally. But despite its popularity, the film has many detractors. In contrast, nearly everybody liked “L.A. Confidential,” and that pic and director Curtis Hanson made an unprecedented sweep of critics prizes, taking top honors with the L.A. and N.Y. film crix, the National Board of Review and the National Society of Film Critics.

So those two films would seem to have the inside track for the top prize, but there is no such thing as a sure bet in the Oscar race (as Lauren Bacall proved last year).

DIRECTOR

The Oscar nominations vary from the Directors Guild contenders: DGA nominees Steven Spielberg (“Amistad”) and Brooks were replaced in Oscar voting by Egoyan and Peter Cattaneo.

Hanson and Van Sant are the only two who are U.S. born. Cameron hails from Canada, Egoyan was born in Cairo and Cattaneo (previously nominated for live-action short, 1990 “Dear Rosie”) is British.

ACTOR

Of the five pic nominees, only “Monty” failed to nab an acting nod.

At 87, Gloria Stuart becomes the oldest acting nominee ever, and half of the 20 thesps are over 50, also including Julie Christie, Judi Dench, Robert Duvall, Peter Fonda, Robert Forster, Dustin Hoffman, Anthony Hopkins, Jack Nicholson, Burt Reynolds.

Twelve of the actors are first-timers in that category: Peter Fonda is the only one of those with a nom in another category, as a writer of “Easy Rider.” He’s competing with his co-star of that 1969 pic, Jack Nicholson.

Nicholson previously was tied with Meryl Streep, Laurence Olivier, Bette Davis at 10 nominations; now he’s in a class by himself, trailing only Hepburn. (Since Hepburn received her 12th nom 49 years after her first, Nicholson has at least until 2018 to catch up.) However, all of hers were in lead category; this is his seventh in lead, with the other four for supporting.

The roster also includes several past winners. Hoffman has two wins on six previous noms; Duvall won before on four earlier noms; Julie Christie (“Afterglow”) won 32 years ago and was nominated again in 1971; and Anthony Hopkins is on his fourth nom and the first in the supporting category, though it’s the second nom for the Welsh actor as an American president (after “Nixon”). Of the five contenders for supporting actress, only “In & Out’s” Joan Cusack was nominated before, for 1988’s “Working Girl.”

Geena Davis and Academy president Robert Rehme announced the nominations at 5:38 Tuesday morning at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences’ Samuel Goldwyn Theater. The awards will be handed out March 23 at the Shrine Auditorium in L.A. Billy Crystal will host the Gilbert Cates-produced kudocast, which will be broadcast live on ABC.

A complete list of nominations follows.

Picture
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

“As Good As It Gets,” Gracie Films production, TriStar; James L. Brooks, Bridget Johnson and Kristi Zea, producers.

“The Full Monty,” Redwave Films production, Fox Searchlight; Uberto Pasolini, producer.

“Good Will Hunting,” Be Gentlemen production, Miramax; Lawrence Bender, producer.

“L.A. Confidential,” Regency Enterprises production, Warner Bros.; Arnon Milchan, Curtis Hanson and Mi-chael Nathanson, producers.

“Titanic,” Lightstorm Entertainment production, 20th Century Fox and Paramount; James Cameron and Jon Landau, producers.

ACTOR
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Matt Damon, “Good Will Hunting.”

Robert Duvall, “The Apostle,” Butcher’s Run production, October Films.

Peter Fonda, “Ulee’s Gold,” Nunez-Gowan/Clinica Estetico production, Orion.

Dustin Hoffman, “Wag the Dog,” New Line Cinema production, New Line.

Jack Nicholson, “As Good As It Gets.”

ACTRESS
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Helena Bonham Carter, “The Wings of the Dove,” Renaissance Films production, Miramax.

Julie Christie, “Afterglow,” Moonstone Entertainment production, Sony Pictures Classics.

Judi Dench, “Mrs. Brown,” Ecosse Films production, Miramax.

Helen Hunt, “As Good As It Gets.”

Kate Winslet, “Titanic.”

SUPPORTING ACTOR
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Robert Forster, “Jackie Brown,” Mighty, Mighty Afrodite production, Miramax.

Anthony Hopkins, “Amistad,” DreamWorks Film production, DreamWorks.

Greg Kinnear, “As Good As It Gets.”

Burt Reynolds, “Boogie Nights,” New Line Cinema production, New Line.

Robin Williams, “Good Will Hunting.”

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Kim Basinger, “L.A. Confidential.”

Joan Cusack, “In & Out,” Scott Rudin production, Paramount in association with Spelling Films.

Minnie Driver, “Good Will Hunting.”

Julianne Moore, “Boogie Nights.”

Gloria Stuart, “Titanic.”

DIRECTOR
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Peter Cattaneo, “The Full Monty.”

Gus Van Sant, “Good Will Hunting.”

Curtis Hanson, “L.A. Confidential.”

Atom Egoyan, “The Sweet Hereafter,” Ego Film Arts production, First Line Features.

James Cameron, “Titanic.”

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Mark Andrus and James L. Brooks, screenplay; Mark Andrus, story, “As Good As It Gets.”

Paul Thomas Anderson, “Boogie Nights.”

Woody Allen, “Deconstructing Harry,” Jean Doumanian production, Fine Line Features.

Simon Beaufoy, “The Full Monty.”

Ben Affleck & Matt Damon, “Good Will Hunting.”

SCREENPLAY ADAPTATION
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Paul Attanasio, “Donnie Brasco,” Mandalay Entertainment production, TriStar.

Brian Helgeland & Curtis Hanson, “L.A. Confidential.”

Atom Egoyan, “The Sweet Hereafter.”

Hilary Henkin and David Mamet, “Wag the Dog.”

Hossein Amini, “The Wings of the Dove.”

FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

“Beyond Silence,” Claussen+Wobke Filmproduktion GmbH/Roxy-Film GmbH Production (Germany).

“Character,” First Floor Features production, Sony Pictures Classics (The Netherlands).

“Four Days in September,” Productions L.C. Barretto Ltda./Filmes do Equador Ltda. production (Brazil).

“Secrets of the Heart,” Aiete Films/Ariane Films production (Spain).

“The Thief,” NTV-Profit (Russia)/Productions le Pont (France)/Roissy Films (France) production, (Russia).

CINEMATOGRAPHY
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Janusz Kaminski, “Amistad.”

Roger Deakins, “Kundun,” Touchstone Pictures production (Buena Vista).

Dante Spinotti, “L.A. Confidential.”

Russell Carpenter, “Titanic.”

Eduardo Serra, “The Wings of the Dove.”

FILM EDITING
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Richard Francis-Bruce, “Air Force One,” Beacon Picture and Columbia Pictures production (Columbia).

Richard Marks, “As Good As It Gets.”

Pietro Scalia, “Good Will Hunting.”

Peter Honess, “L.A. Confidential.”

Conrad Buff, James Cameron and Richard A. Harris, “Titanic.”

ORIGINAL MUSICAL OR COMEDY SCORE
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Stephen Flaherty, music; Lynn Ahrens, lyrics; David Newman, orchestral score, “Anastasia,” 20th Century Fox production, 20th Century Fox.

Hans Zimmer, “As Good As It Gets.”

Anne Dudley, “The Full Monty.”

Danny Elfman, “Men in Black,” Amblin Entertainment production, Columbia.

James Newton Howard, “My Best Friend’s Wedding,” Jerry Zucker/Predawn production, TriStar.

ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

John Williams, “Amistad.”

Danny Elfman, “Good Will Hunting.”

Philip Glass, “Kundun.”

Jerry Goldsmith, “L.A. Confidential.”

James Horner, “Titanic.”

ORIGINAL SONG
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

“Go the Distance” from “Hercules,” Walt Disney Pictures production, Buena Vista. Music by Alan Menken, lyrics by David Zippel.

“How Do I Live” from “Con Air,” Touchstone Pictures production, Buena Vista. Music and lyrics by Diane Warren.

“Journey to the Past” from “Anastasia.” Music by Stephen Flaherty, lyrics by Lynn Ahrens.

“Miss Misery” from “Good Will Hunting.” Music and lyrics by Elliott Smith.

“My Heart Will Go On” from “Titanic.” Music by James Horner, lyrics by Will Jennings.

ART DIRECTION
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Jan Roelfs, art direction; Nancy Nye, set decoration; “Gattaca,” Jersey Films production, Columbia.

Dante Ferretti, art direction; Francesca Lo Schiavo, set decoration; “Kundun.”

Jeannine Oppewall, art direction; Jay R. Hart, set decoration; “L.A. Confidential.”

Bo Welch, art direction; Cheryl Carasik, set decoration; “Men in Black.”

Peter Lamont, art direction; Michael Ford, set decoration; “Titanic.”

COSTUME DESIGN
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Ruth E. Carter, “Amistad.”

Dante Ferretti, “Kundun.”

Janet Patterson, “Oscar and Lucinda,” Dalton Films production, Fox Searchlight.

Deborah L. Scott, “Titanic.”

Sandy Powell, “The Wings of the Dove.”

MAKEUP
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Rick Baker and David LeRoy Anderson, “Men in Black.”

Lisa Westcott, Veronica Brebner and Beverley Binda, “Mrs. Brown.”

Tina Earnshaw, Greg Cannom and Simon Thompson, “Titanic.”

SOUND
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Paul Massey, Rick Kline, D.M. Hemphill and Keith A. Wester, “Air Force One.”

Kevin O’Connell, Greg P. Russell and Arthur Rochester, “Con Air.”

Randy Thom, Tom Johnson, Dennis Sands and William B. Kaplan, “Contact,” Warner Bros. production, Warner Bros.

Andy Nelson, Anna Behlmer and Kirk Francis, “L.A. Confidential.”

Gary Rydstrom, Tom Johnson, Gary Summers and Mark Ulano, “Titanic.”

SOUND EFFECTS EDITING
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Mark P. Stoeckinger and Per Hallberg, “Face/Off,” Douglas/Reuther production, WCG production, David Permut production, Paramount and Touchstone.

Mark Mangini, “The Fifth Element,” Gaumont production, Columbia.

Tom Bellfort and Christopher Boyes, “Titanic.”

VISUAL EFFECTS
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

Dennis Muren, Stan Winston, Randal M. Dutra and Michael Lantieri, “The Lost World: Jurassic Park,” Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment production, Universal.

Phil Tippett, Scott E. Anderson, Alec Gillis and John Richardson, “Starship Troopers,” TriStar Pictures and Touchstone Pictures production, TriStar.

Robert Legato, Mark Lasoff, Thomas L. Fisher and Michael Kanfer, “Titanic.”

ANIMATED SHORT
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

“Famous Fred,” TVC London production for Channel 4 and S4C; Joanna Quinn, producer.

“Geri’s Game,” Pixar Animation Studios production; Jan Pinkava, producer.

“La Vieille Dame et Les Pigeons” (“The Old Lady and the Pigeons”), Pascal Blais/Les Armateurs/Odec Kid Cartoons production; Sylvain Chomet, producer.

“The Mermaid,” Film Company “DAGO”/”SHAR” School-Studio/Studio “PANORAMA,” Yaroslavl pro-duction; Alexander Petrov, producer.

“Redux Riding Hood,” Walt Disney Television Animation production; Steve Moore, producer.

LIVE-ACTION SHORT
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

“Dance Lexie Dance,” Raw Nerve production for Northern Lights; Pearse Moore and Tim Loane, producers.

“It’s Good to Talk,” Feasible Films production; Roger Goldby and Barney Reisz, producers.

“Sweethearts?,” Metronome Productions/Victoria Film production; Birger Larsen and Thomas Lydholm, producers.

“Visas and Virtue,” Cedar Grove production; Chris Tashima and Chris Donahue, producers.

“Wolfgang,” M&M production for Dansk Novellefilm; Kim Magnusson and Anders Thomas Jensen, producers.

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

“Ayn Rand: A Sense of Life,” A G Media Corp. Ltd. production, Strand Releasing; Michael Paxton, pro-ducer.

“Colors Straight Up,” Echo Pictures production; Michele Ohayon and Julia Schacter, producers.

“4 Little Girls,” HBO Documentary Film/40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks production; Spike Lee and Sam Pollard, producers.

“The Long Way Home,” Moriah Films production at the Simon Wiesenthal Center, Seventh Art; Rabbi Marvin Hier and Richard Trank, producers.

“Waco: The Rules of Engagement,” SomFord Entertainment/Fifth Estate production.

DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
REACTIONS FROM NOMINEES

“Alaska: Spirit of the Wild,” Graphic Films Corp. production; George Casey and Paul Novros, producers.

“Amazon,” Ogden Entertainment production; Kieth Merrill and Jonathan Stern, producers.

“Daughter of the Bride,” Terri Randall Film and Video production; Terri Randall, producer.

“Still Kicking: The Fabulous Palm Springs Follies,” Little Apple Film production; Mel Damski and Andrea Blaugrund, producers.

“A Story of Healing,” Dewey-Obenchain Films production; Donna Dewey and Carol Pasternak, producers.

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