Its content still manages to enlighten those of a certain age.The construction of a title song, which can vary, depending on the star of the show or the time period of the story, is illustrated with three versions of "I Do! I Do!" --- one of which was intended for an aborted Julie Andrews film version. Trunk songs abound, as Jones relates collaborating with Schmidt on 114 songs for "110 in the Shade" in 1963. In preparation for out-of-town tryouts, the team wanted to have extra songs ready just in case they were summoned for latenight revisions They are nicely sampled here with J. Mark McVey as the swaggering rainmaker, Starbuck, and Jo Ann Cunningham as the love-starved Lizzie.The most poignantly polished gems come from the innovative 1969 production of "Celebration." "Under the Tree" serves as a haunting, seductive duet for Cunningham and McVey, and Emma Lampert beautifully realizes the plight of "Orphan in the Storm."The sprightly title song, "The Show Goes On" is marked for a musicalization of "Mirette," based on a popular children's book. "Grover's Corner," the long-awaited tuner of "Our Town" is generously represented with a trio of sensitive songs.The show is modestly staged; direction amounts to a singer's placement for a song. Schmidt provides noble and assured accompaniment at the piano, but maintains an intense frown throughout.As "The Fantasticks" enjoys its 38th year as the longest-running musical of all time, it's warming to have a tribute to its creators, even if they have to do it themselves.

Its content still manages to enlighten those of a certain age.The construction of a title song, which can vary, depending on the star of the show or the time period of the story, is illustrated with three versions of “I Do! I Do!” — one of which was intended for an aborted Julie Andrews film version. Trunk songs abound, as Jones relates collaborating with Schmidt on 114 songs for “110 in the Shade” in 1963. In preparation for out-of-town tryouts, the team wanted to have extra songs ready just in case they were summoned for latenight revisions They are nicely sampled here with J. Mark McVey as the swaggering rainmaker, Starbuck, and Jo Ann Cunningham as the love-starved Lizzie.The most poignantly polished gems come from the innovative 1969 production of “Celebration.” “Under the Tree” serves as a haunting, seductive duet for Cunningham and McVey, and Emma Lampert beautifully realizes the plight of “Orphan in the Storm.”The sprightly title song, “The Show Goes On” is marked for a musicalization of “Mirette,” based on a popular children’s book. “Grover’s Corner,” the long-awaited tuner of “Our Town” is generously represented with a trio of sensitive songs.The show is modestly staged; direction amounts to a singer’s placement for a song. Schmidt provides noble and assured accompaniment at the piano, but maintains an intense frown throughout.As “The Fantasticks” enjoys its 38th year as the longest-running musical of all time, it’s warming to have a tribute to its creators, even if they have to do it themselves.

The Show Goes on

New York: Opened Dec. 17, 1997, at the Theatre at St. Peter's Church.

Production

NEW YORK A York Theatre Company presentation of a musical in two acts, music by Harvey Schmidt, lyrics by Tom Jones. Direction and musical staging by Drew Scott Harris. Musical staging and choreography by Janet Watson.

Creative

Set, James Morgan; costumes, Suzy Benzinger; lighting, Mary Jo Dondlinger; stage manager, Barnett Feingold. Artistic director, James Morgan. Opened Dec. 17, 1997, at the Theatre at St. Peter's Church. Reviewed Dec. 19; 150 seats; $ 35 top. Running time: 2 HOURS.

Cast

Cast: Harvey Schmidt, Tom Jones, Jo Ann Cunningham, Emma Lampert, J. Mark McVey.In "The Show Goes On", tunesmiths Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones turn the pages of a scrapbook with a potpourri of songs created for musicals both on and Off Broadway. Romantic, whimsical and satirical in content, the lilting memories are merged into a tastefully melodic and amusing revue.The entertainment is a revised and updated version of the team's "Portfolio Revue," presented over 20 years ago at their Portfolio Studio workshop. Lyricist Jones serves as narrator, and he is an amiably impish host, assuring his audience that this is not another "and then I wrote" show. One does need a string of hit tunes for such a concept. Following "Try to Remember" and "My Cup Runneth Over" in the first act, the program offers little for the hit parade, but focuses upon outtakes, works-in-progress and experimental projects.Jones invests a great deal of enthusiasm in his introductions. Noting that topical songs written for revues often quickly become museum pieces, the pair revive "Mr. Off-Broadway," from Julius Monk's 1959 "Demi-Dozen."
Musical staging and choreography by Janet Watson. Set, James Morgan; costumes, Suzy Benzinger; lighting, Mary Jo Dondlinger; stage manager, Barnett Feingold. Artistic director, James Morgan. Opened Dec. 17, 1997, at the Theatre at St. Peter's Church. Reviewed Dec. 19; 150 seats; $35 top. Running time: 2 HOURS.
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