The Seagull

Chekhov's wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of "The Seagull" suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly mawkish.

With:
Medvedenko - Alex Draper
Masha - Francesca Di Mauro
Sorin - Bill Striglos
Konstantin - Greg Naughton
Nina - Angie Phillips
Polina - Molly Regan
Dorn - Joe Ponazecki
Shamraev - Tom Brennan
Arakadina - Maria Tucci
Trigorin - Mark Blum
Yakov - Rainard Rachele

Chekhov’s wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of “The Seagull” suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly mawkish. The major fault would seem to lie with the languid and lumbered staging by Austin Pendleton.

The director’s deliberate approach seems to be in search of the quiet melancholy and boring discontent of Chekhov’s frustrated household. What should be wistful and touching is simply dour. An emotional pitch is missing here, and one’s heart should be able to reach out to these people. The actors seldom give us the opportunity.

Maria Tucci, as the self-centered, flamboyant actress Arkadina, displays a temperamental attitude and is coyly ardent as she attempts to preserve her relationship with Trigorin (Mark Blum), a second-rate novelist. Missing is the charm and grace of a celebrated stage actress.

Blum, as the weary but impassioned author, displays little passion or desperation, and Joe Ponazecki provides a one-note, expressionless portrait as the resigned and indifferent doctor. In Stoppard’s pruned version, the wan Masha seems to have lost her sharp tongue, giving Francesca Di Mauro little more to do than mope about.

Greg Naughton, as the suicidal aspiring playwright Konstantin, and Angie Phillips, as the restless seagull Nina, never find the true anguish and intensity of their characters, and there is little chemistry between them. The stage-struck Nina, as portrayed by Phillips, is more fidgety than restless, and a rueful sigh becomes merely a whine.

Only Tom Brennan manages to reveal some blustery humor as the rural bailiff. Blue Light has assembled a fine, experienced cast, but they are wandering here without a unified focus. Pendleton is good at creating picturesque little groupings that often convey the summery resonance of a Renoir picnic. Unfortunately, the director’s pretty canvas never comes to life.

The Seagull

Theater Four; 248 seats; $ 37.50

Production: A Blue Light Theater Co. presentation of the play in one act by Anton Chekhov , translated by Tom Stoppard. Directed by Austin Pendleton.

Creative: Set, Michael Schweikardt; costumes, Laurie Churba; lighting, John Lasiter; sound, Jerry M. Yager. Opened May 27, 1998. Reviewed May 21. Running time: 2 HOURS, 20 MIN.

Cast: Medvedenko - Alex Draper
Masha - Francesca Di Mauro
Sorin - Bill Striglos
Konstantin - Greg Naughton
Nina - Angie Phillips
Polina - Molly Regan
Dorn - Joe Ponazecki
Shamraev - Tom Brennan
Arakadina - Maria Tucci
Trigorin - Mark Blum
Yakov - Rainard Rachele

More Legit

  • Hello, Dolly! Bette Midler

    Bette Midler to Return to Broadway's 'Hello, Dolly!'

    Chekhov’s wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of “The Seagull” suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly […]

  • My Fair Lady review

    Broadway Review: 'My Fair Lady'

    Chekhov’s wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of “The Seagull” suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly […]

  • Tony Awards: Sara Bareilles, Josh Groban

    Sara Bareilles, Josh Groban to Host 2018 Tony Awards

    Chekhov’s wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of “The Seagull” suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly […]

  • New York Mayor's Office women

    New York Mayor's Office Details New $5 Million Women's Fund for Film, Theater

    Chekhov’s wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of “The Seagull” suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly […]

  • Tina review

    West End Review: Tina Turner Musical 'Tina'

    Chekhov’s wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of “The Seagull” suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly […]

  • Jamie Parker Harry Potter

    Stagecraft Podcast: 'Cursed Child's' Jamie Parker on Joining the 'Harry Potter' Universe

    Chekhov’s wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of “The Seagull” suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly […]

  • 2018 National Playwrights Conference

    Beth Henley, J.T. Rogers and Sarah DeLappe Set for 2018 O'Neill Playwrights Conference

    Chekhov’s wry and tender study of unfulfilled lives is stifled in a new translation by Tom Stoppard. The Blue Light Theater Co. production of “The Seagull” suffers on several levels. Performed sans intermission, the play never soars. The acting ensemble fails to form a cohesive bond, and individual performances range from barely acceptable to embarrassingly […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content