Review: ‘Space Monkeys’

The mission of Manchester, England, dance-rock band the Space Monkeys is simple enough: musical time-travel 10 years into the past, with a nod to the cutting edge.

The mission of Manchester, England, dance-rock band the Space Monkeys is simple enough: musical time-travel 10 years into the past, with a nod to the cutting edge. The 3-year-old quartet inexplicably but somewhat effectively revisits the easily forgotten land of shoegazer bands like the Happy Mondays, Stone Roses and Ride, adding their own modern twists like rap samples, jungle beats and house rhythms to the classic Brit-pop formula.

At the half-full Troubadour, the Space Monkeys played an earnest but somewhat sluggish show. Singer-guitarist Richard McNevin-Duff sang his lyrics of introspection, loathing and hopefulness in an unpracticed half-shout, similar to Oasis’ Liam Gallagher, but not nearly as interesting to watch.

The Monkeys, about midway through their first full U.S. tour, were at their best when engaging in extended, DJ-driven dance romps, as on current single “Sugar Cane.” Also a highlight was the opening song, the wild dance number “Acid House Killed Rock and Roll,” with its high-energy, dance-floor propulsion and tongue-in-cheek lyrics about the presumed downfall of rock music.

Space Monkeys

Troubadour; 450 capacity; $10

Production

Presented by Goldenvoice. Reviewed March 6, 1998.

With

Band: Richard McNevin-Duff, Dom Morrison, Chas Morrison, Tony Pipes.
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading