Review: ‘April Story’

Clearly designed as a divertissement after his epic "Swallowtail Butterfly," Shunji Iwai's latest, "April Story," is an almost perfect miniature of mood and feelings, the cinematic equivalent of a haiku poem. Immaculately lensed tale of a young woman settling into university life in Tokyo, but with a secret agenda, is specialized fare even for arthouses, but a natural fest and tube item. Film gets its international premiere with a short run at London's ICA Cinema, double-billed with Iwai's 1993 TV pic "Fried Dragon Fish," both distributed by U.K. newcomer Asian Film Library in association with Iwai's company, Rockwell Eyes.

Clearly designed as a divertissement after his epic “Swallowtail Butterfly,” Shunji Iwai’s latest, “April Story,” is an almost perfect miniature of mood and feelings, the cinematic equivalent of a haiku poem. Immaculately lensed tale of a young woman settling into university life in Tokyo, but with a secret agenda, is specialized fare even for arthouses, but a natural fest and tube item. Film gets its international premiere with a short run at London’s ICA Cinema, double-billed with Iwai’s 1993 TV pic “Fried Dragon Fish,” both distributed by U.K. newcomer Asian Film Library in association with Iwai’s company, Rockwell Eyes.

Iwai’s pics are all different in flavor, and thisone, though sharing some of the metaphysical feel of “Love Letter” (1995), which first drew him to international attention, is far simpler. Its deliberate combo of innocence, visual beauty and simplicity may not appeal to all auds — and certainly separates it from the mass of nihilistic, gun-toting indies by many young Japanese filmers — but on its own terms it is a small gem.

Shy Uzuki (Takako Matsu), from Hokkaido in Japan’s far north, arrives in Tokyo in the fall, when the peach blossom is falling, to enroll at Musashino U. She moves into a lonely apartment, feels uneasy introducing herself to fellow students (who think she’s a bit of a hick) and is befriended by a straight-talking, edgy student, Saeko (Rumi), with whom she joins a fly-fishing club.

Iwai gradually submerges the viewer in Uzuki’s world — riding her bike, reading in the park, fleeing from a weirdo in a movie theater — as well as the trivia of someone adapting to a new life, climate, city, group of people and set of ways. She tries to make contact with a reclusive female neighbor, and repeatedly visits a bookstore. Only from the midpoint on, as her past life is sketched in for the viewer, do we gradually understand her reason for attending the university.

It’s a slim picture, only just over an hour long, but beautifully shaped to the final reels, which are both funny and moving, set in April showers, and with a typical Iwai kick in the tail. Playing by the cast is charming and unaffected, especially by young local star Matsu, who’s cuter than a button. Pic is sweet without being saccharine, uncynical without being naive; as a portrait of a young person’s untrammeled emotions, it recalls ’60s European cinema in its freshness and innocence.

Tech credits are top-class, with Iwai’s natural use of widescreen broadening the film’s poetry rather than exposing the material’s narrative. Music is mostly gentle and lyrical, dominated by piano.

April Story

(SHIGATSU MONOGATARI)

Production

(ROMANTIC DRAMA -- JAPANESE) An Asian Film Library/Rockwell Eyes release (in U.K.) of a Rockwell Eyes production. (International sales: Fortissimo Film Sales, Amsterdam.) Produced, directed, written, edited by Shunji Iwai.

Crew

Camera (color, Panavision Japan widescreen), Noboru Shinoda; music, CLASSIC; production designer, Yuji Tsuzuki; costumes, Hiromi Shintani; sound (DTS Stereo), Hitoshi Tsurumaki; sound designer, Jun Nakamura; assistant director, Isao Yukisada. Reviewed at ICA Cinema, London, Aug. 3, 1998. (In Toronto Film Festival --- New Beat of Japan.) Running time: 66 MIN.

With

Uzuki Nireno ..... Takako Matsu Yamazaki ..... Seiichi Tanabe Teruko Kitao ..... Kaori Fujii Saeko Sano ..... Rumi Man in gallery ..... Kazuhiko Kato Creep in Movie Theater ..... Ken Mitsuishi Fukatsu ..... Kanji Tsuda
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading