Two Voices (Mon. (16), 9-11 p.m., Lifetime) Filmed in San Diego by Freyda Rothstein Prods. and Hearst Entertainment. Executive producer, Freyda Rothstein; director, Peter Levin; writer, Jim Macak; camera, James Glennon; editor, Joan A. Martinelli; sound, Jay Patterson; music, J.A.C. Redford; production designer, Diane Hughes; casting, Abra Edelman, Elisa Goodman. Cast: Mary McDonnell, Gail O'Grady, Richard Gilliland, Nicholas Surovy, Fredric Lane, Casey Biggs, Dennis Creaghan, Brock Pierce, Sheeri Rappaport, Lea Moreno, Bill Brochtrup, Jane Daly, Judith-Marie Bergan, Leslie Easterbrook, Arthur Rosenberg, Haynes Brooke, Anita Finlay, James Lancaster, Norman Snow, Vaughn Armstrong, David J. Partington, Doug Waldo, Joe Ivy, Eric Zivot, Henry Jordan, Annie Hinton, Shana Wride, Melody Rae, Patrick Birkett, Tamiko Washington, Andrea Naverson, Carolyn Kimball, Susan Denaker, Anita Le Brecque, Stacey Herring, John Cruz. Asincere, dedicated vidfilm about how two dissimilar women joined forces in the '80s to fight the outrages of silicone implants, "Two Voices" moves step-by-step towards burying powerful implant-manufacturing Dow Corning Corp. and their associates. The women's personal travails make up the story; if there's a tract-like quality to some of the vidpic, "Voices" still offers a valuable history lesson as well as how two women can get the ball rolling. BevHills physician's no-nonsense wife Sybil Goldrich (Mary McDonnell of "Dances With Wolves") and milder-at-first Kentuckian Kathleen Anneken (Gail O'Grady, vet of "NYPD Blue"), connect when each runs afoul of silicone breast implants. Sybil, double mastectomy patient after cancer, wants to reclaim her unscarred form through surgery; Kathleen seeks cosmetic help for what she feels is an inadequate bustline. Both women suffer dreadful fallouts from their silicone breast implants. Sybil's article in Ms. magazine ignites Kathleen's fire enough to make her contact Sybil, who at first has a patronizing attitude towards Kathleen and her presumably more shallow motive for her operation. Director Peter Levin successfully established the differences between the two femmes, but whether or not they ever become real friends remains a question. But they connect and found Command Trust Network, which goes nationwide to warn patients and prospective patients about silicone's dangers. They lobby, they write, they go after political and medical folks with the truth; eventually they gain help. Disconcertingly, Jim Macak's otherwise straightforward teleplay is burdened with "For dramatic purposes characters or events are composites or have been fictionalized," as the disclaimer reads. Thus , dependable Richard Gilliland plays a sympathetic FDA character, but the character's a composite, and Dow Corning's repped by a solo attorney, not the full crew on hand for such an significant battle; the substitutes water down the thrust of the drama. Kathleen's husband David (Fredric Lane), who vaguely is a businessman, is a pleasant, supportive character; Sybil's husband, Dr. Jimmy (Nicholas Surovy), is on her side but gets irritated with her for devoting all her time to The Cause. Or did he? The action and characters throughout the important vidpic need security checks, since such fiddling with truths that made headlines --- after all, this was a class action suit that would bring down an empire in 1994 ---weakens the vidpic's impact. And wouldn't it be interesting the hear what the AMA and other medical associations were doing to straighten out the mess? But Macak has penned good scenes such as a breakfast tangle between the two women and a brief reconciliation seg between determined Sybil and her hubby. And director Levin plays on the two women's characters' distinct differences ably enough to give them individuality. Production designer Diane Hughes has done a notable job turning San Diego into Washington, Beverly Hills and wherever, and James Glennon's camerawork, especially in the Congressional committee seshes, rings true. Other tech credits are a plus. Subject is too weighty not to name names, at least as much as it's possible without generating libel suits. The women and the org saved lives and families, and their story needs airing as a dedicated drama, not as a pat telefilm in which characters act oh-so-TV predictably. The actual heroines are simply too important to have their personalities and their full stories told with convenient composites or fiction.

Two Voices (Mon. (16), 9-11 p.m., Lifetime) Filmed in San Diego by Freyda Rothstein Prods. and Hearst Entertainment. Executive producer, Freyda Rothstein; director, Peter Levin; writer, Jim Macak; camera, James Glennon; editor, Joan A. Martinelli; sound, Jay Patterson; music, J.A.C. Redford; production designer, Diane Hughes; casting, Abra Edelman, Elisa Goodman. Cast: Mary McDonnell, Gail O’Grady, Richard Gilliland, Nicholas Surovy, Fredric Lane, Casey Biggs, Dennis Creaghan, Brock Pierce, Sheeri Rappaport, Lea Moreno, Bill Brochtrup, Jane Daly, Judith-Marie Bergan, Leslie Easterbrook, Arthur Rosenberg, Haynes Brooke, Anita Finlay, James Lancaster, Norman Snow, Vaughn Armstrong, David J. Partington, Doug Waldo, Joe Ivy, Eric Zivot, Henry Jordan, Annie Hinton, Shana Wride, Melody Rae, Patrick Birkett, Tamiko Washington, Andrea Naverson, Carolyn Kimball, Susan Denaker, Anita Le Brecque, Stacey Herring, John Cruz. Asincere, dedicated vidfilm about how two dissimilar women joined forces in the ’80s to fight the outrages of silicone implants, “Two Voices” moves step-by-step towards burying powerful implant-manufacturing Dow Corning Corp. and their associates. The women’s personal travails make up the story; if there’s a tract-like quality to some of the vidpic, “Voices” still offers a valuable history lesson as well as how two women can get the ball rolling. BevHills physician’s no-nonsense wife Sybil Goldrich (Mary McDonnell of “Dances With Wolves”) and milder-at-first Kentuckian Kathleen Anneken (Gail O’Grady, vet of “NYPD Blue”), connect when each runs afoul of silicone breast implants. Sybil, double mastectomy patient after cancer, wants to reclaim her unscarred form through surgery; Kathleen seeks cosmetic help for what she feels is an inadequate bustline. Both women suffer dreadful fallouts from their silicone breast implants. Sybil’s article in Ms. magazine ignites Kathleen’s fire enough to make her contact Sybil, who at first has a patronizing attitude towards Kathleen and her presumably more shallow motive for her operation. Director Peter Levin successfully established the differences between the two femmes, but whether or not they ever become real friends remains a question. But they connect and found Command Trust Network, which goes nationwide to warn patients and prospective patients about silicone’s dangers. They lobby, they write, they go after political and medical folks with the truth; eventually they gain help. Disconcertingly, Jim Macak’s otherwise straightforward teleplay is burdened with “For dramatic purposes characters or events are composites or have been fictionalized,” as the disclaimer reads. Thus , dependable Richard Gilliland plays a sympathetic FDA character, but the character’s a composite, and Dow Corning’s repped by a solo attorney, not the full crew on hand for such an significant battle; the substitutes water down the thrust of the drama. Kathleen’s husband David (Fredric Lane), who vaguely is a businessman, is a pleasant, supportive character; Sybil’s husband, Dr. Jimmy (Nicholas Surovy), is on her side but gets irritated with her for devoting all her time to The Cause. Or did he? The action and characters throughout the important vidpic need security checks, since such fiddling with truths that made headlines — after all, this was a class action suit that would bring down an empire in 1994 —weakens the vidpic’s impact. And wouldn’t it be interesting the hear what the AMA and other medical associations were doing to straighten out the mess? But Macak has penned good scenes such as a breakfast tangle between the two women and a brief reconciliation seg between determined Sybil and her hubby. And director Levin plays on the two women’s characters’ distinct differences ably enough to give them individuality. Production designer Diane Hughes has done a notable job turning San Diego into Washington, Beverly Hills and wherever, and James Glennon’s camerawork, especially in the Congressional committee seshes, rings true. Other tech credits are a plus. Subject is too weighty not to name names, at least as much as it’s possible without generating libel suits. The women and the org saved lives and families, and their story needs airing as a dedicated drama, not as a pat telefilm in which characters act oh-so-TV predictably. The actual heroines are simply too important to have their personalities and their full stories told with convenient composites or fiction.

Two Voices

Mon. (16), 9-11 p.m., Lifetime

Production

Filmed in San Diego by Freyda Rothstein Prods. and Hearst Entertainment. Executive producer, Freyda Rothstein; director, Peter Levin; writer, Jim Macak

Crew

camera, James Glennon; editor, Joan A. Martinelli; sound, Jay Patterson; music, J.A.C. Redford; production designer, Diane Hughes; casting, Abra Edelman, Elisa Goodman.

Cast

Mary McDonnell, Gail O'Grady, Richard Gilliland, Nicholas Surovy, Fredric Lane, Casey Biggs, Dennis Creaghan, Brock Pierce, Sheeri Rappaport, Lea Moreno, Bill Brochtrup, Jane Daly, Judith-Marie Bergan, Leslie Easterbrook, Arthur Rosenberg, Haynes Brooke, Anita Finlay, James Lancaster, Norman Snow, Vaughn Armstrong, David J. Partington, Doug Waldo, Joe Ivy, Eric Zivot, Henry Jordan, Annie Hinton, Shana Wride, Melody Rae, Patrick Birkett, Tamiko Washington, Andrea Naverson, Carolyn Kimball, Susan Denaker, Anita Le Brecque, Stacey Herring, John Cruz.
Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more