Opening credits throw almost every kind of media into a lively stew --- a fun way to begin. But then the educational plot kicks in: Al comes under the "bad influence" (which happens to be the title of this episode) of "cool guy" Spike (Kevin Weisman). What works is that the kids aren't condescended to: In fact, the show's lesson is imparted with a broad wink at the audience.

Opening credits throw almost every kind of media into a lively stew — a fun way to begin. But then the educational plot kicks in: Al comes under the “bad influence” (which happens to be the title of this episode) of “cool guy” Spike (Kevin Weisman). What works is that the kids aren’t condescended to: In fact, the show’s lesson is imparted with a broad wink at the audience.

What also works are the TV blurb parodies, as well as other TV spoofs, including a “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood” takeoff with hostile hand puppets.

What doesn’t work is the cast’s acting (stiff, flat) and some plot elements (way too goofy). Borderline is Harvey the Wonder Hamster (too forced).

Hopefully, future episodes will use more animation and other media, and pace, although frantic, should appeal to the candidates for Ritalin its aimed at.

The Weird Al Show

(Sat. (13), 11:30-noon, CBS)

Production

Filmed by Dick Clark Prods. Executive producers, Dick Clark, Jay Levey, Al Yankovic; producer, Thomas F. Frank; co-producer, Brooke Karzen; director, Peyton Reed; writers, Al Yankovic, Susan Amerikaner, Tracy Berna, Zeke Kamm, Mark O'Keefe, Ron Weiner, Heidi Atherton.

Crew

Set designer, Wayne White; art director, Larry Wierner; costumes, Julie Engelsman; music, Will Anderson, Stephen Jay, Jim West; theme song, Weird Al Yankovic.

Cast

Cast: Weird Al Yankovic, Brain Haley, Kevin Weisman, G. Le'Roi Gray Judy Tenuta, Paula Jai Parker, Patton Oswalt, Danielle Weeks, Julie Brown, Barenaked Ladies Mining the territory so joyfully and subversively excavated by Pee-Wee Herman on "Pee-Wee's Playhouse," Weird Al Yankovic gets somewhat buried in his own manic expectations, and as a result, "The Weird Al Show" shows promise, but Al himself doesn't possess Pee-Wee's sly humor or geek-cool attitude. Younger kids may find frantic pace and some of Weird Al's comic bits enticing, but show could use a bigger dose of the hilarious parody Yankovic limns so well in his pop song spoofs.
set designer, Wayne White; art director, Larry Wierner; costumes, Julie Engelsman; music, Will Anderson, Stephen Jay, Jim West; theme song, Weird Al Yankovic.

Filed Under:

Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more