On the Edge of Innocence (Sun. (20), 9-11 p.m., NBC) Filmed in Los Angeles by Dan Wigutow Prods. in association with Paramount Network Television. Executive producers, Jeni Munn, Joan Sittenfield, Dan Wigutow, Julie Cohen; co-producers, Kellie Martin, Debbie Martin; director, Peter Werner; writer, Maxine Herman; camera, Neil Roach; editor, Paul Dixon; production design, Denise Hudson; sound, Carey Lindley; Music, Dana Kaprof; casting, Molly Lopata. Cast: Kellie Martin, James Marsden, Karen Young, Lisa Jakub, Jamie Kennedy, Vince Vieluf, Terry O'Quinn, Olivia Birkelund, Sullivan Walker, Jessica Harper, Ronald Guttman, Kevin Dunn. On the Edge of Innocence" is a misleading title for this misguided meller: more like "Over the Edge of Innocence," as the teen brats depicted here haven't experienced innocence since pre-school, and even that's questionable, seeing the way they carry on. Toplining Kellie Martin, who also co-produced and delivers a sometimes powerful perf as a manic depressive, "Innocence" is lost in tiresome teenage rebels and cut-out authority figures. Better rent "Rebel Without a Cause" for real teen angst without the Lithium. Telepic spends the first 40 minutes setting up the stories of Zoe (Martin) and Jake (James Marsden) , both troubled kids who end up in the same mental institution, an institution in which the doctors seem to have absolutely no authority. It's kind of like a Golden Books version of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest." Zoe and Jake are the hot inmate couple and when Zoe's shrink tries to separate them, the two instigate a breakout, taking along fellow inmates. They bumble about, hatching a plan to go to Mexico, and on the way steal cars, money and credit cards, and accidentally shoot a security guard. All the while they declare their undying love for one another. Far from being romantic, the kids are whiny and writer Maxine Herman fails to supply any emotional or sympathetic characters that could connect with the audience. The psychology used to explain away Zoe's and Jake's emotional problems are obvious, and all the mayhem their breakout causes does not pay off in a way that's rooted in reality. The authority figures the kids reject --- especially the see-through parents --- are so completely thin and harmless, it's like, "What's all the fuss about? Take your medicine and go to bed!" Martin does some nice acting, and Marsden, a pleasant young actor, knows how to make the most of his Versace-ad looks. Direction by Peter Werner keeps things moving, especially in a nicely staged amusement park scene on the Santa Monica Pier. Tech credits are fine.

On the Edge of Innocence (Sun. (20), 9-11 p.m., NBC) Filmed in Los Angeles by Dan Wigutow Prods. in association with Paramount Network Television. Executive producers, Jeni Munn, Joan Sittenfield, Dan Wigutow, Julie Cohen; co-producers, Kellie Martin, Debbie Martin; director, Peter Werner; writer, Maxine Herman; camera, Neil Roach; editor, Paul Dixon; production design, Denise Hudson; sound, Carey Lindley; Music, Dana Kaprof; casting, Molly Lopata. Cast: Kellie Martin, James Marsden, Karen Young, Lisa Jakub, Jamie Kennedy, Vince Vieluf, Terry O’Quinn, Olivia Birkelund, Sullivan Walker, Jessica Harper, Ronald Guttman, Kevin Dunn. On the Edge of Innocence” is a misleading title for this misguided meller: more like “Over the Edge of Innocence,” as the teen brats depicted here haven’t experienced innocence since pre-school, and even that’s questionable, seeing the way they carry on. Toplining Kellie Martin, who also co-produced and delivers a sometimes powerful perf as a manic depressive, “Innocence” is lost in tiresome teenage rebels and cut-out authority figures. Better rent “Rebel Without a Cause” for real teen angst without the Lithium. Telepic spends the first 40 minutes setting up the stories of Zoe (Martin) and Jake (James Marsden) , both troubled kids who end up in the same mental institution, an institution in which the doctors seem to have absolutely no authority. It’s kind of like a Golden Books version of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Zoe and Jake are the hot inmate couple and when Zoe’s shrink tries to separate them, the two instigate a breakout, taking along fellow inmates. They bumble about, hatching a plan to go to Mexico, and on the way steal cars, money and credit cards, and accidentally shoot a security guard. All the while they declare their undying love for one another. Far from being romantic, the kids are whiny and writer Maxine Herman fails to supply any emotional or sympathetic characters that could connect with the audience. The psychology used to explain away Zoe’s and Jake’s emotional problems are obvious, and all the mayhem their breakout causes does not pay off in a way that’s rooted in reality. The authority figures the kids reject — especially the see-through parents — are so completely thin and harmless, it’s like, “What’s all the fuss about? Take your medicine and go to bed!” Martin does some nice acting, and Marsden, a pleasant young actor, knows how to make the most of his Versace-ad looks. Direction by Peter Werner keeps things moving, especially in a nicely staged amusement park scene on the Santa Monica Pier. Tech credits are fine.

On the Edge of Innocence

Sun. (20), 9-11 p.m., NBC

Production

Filmed in Los Angeles by Dan Wigutow Prods. in association with Paramount Network Television. Executive producers, Jeni Munn, Joan Sittenfield, Dan Wigutow, Julie Cohen; co-producers, Kellie Martin, Debbie Martin; director, Peter Werner; writer, Maxine Herman

Crew

Camera, Neil Roach; editor, Paul Dixon; production design, Denise Hudson; sound, Carey Lindley; Music, Dana Kaprof; casting, Molly Lopata.

Cast

Cast: Kellie Martin, James Marsden, Karen Young, Lisa Jakub, Jamie Kennedy, Vince Vieluf, Terry O'Quinn, Olivia Birkelund, Sullivan Walker, Jessica Harper, Ronald Guttman, Kevin Dunn.

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