Mandela and de Klerk (Sun. (16), 8-10 p.m., Showtime) Filmed in South Africa by Showtime Networks in association with Hallmark Entertainment. Producer, Bernie Sofronski; co-producer, Cedric Scott; line producers, Michael L. Games, David Wicht; director, Joseph Sargent; script, Richard Wesley; camera, Tobias Schliessler; editor, Benjamin A. Weissman, Debra Karen; production designer, David Barkham; costumes, Diana Cilliers; sound, Alan Gerhardt; music, Cedric Gradus-Samson; casting, Moonyeenn Lee. Cast: Sidney Poitier, Michael Caine, Tina Lifford, Gerry Maritz, Ian Roberts, Terry Norton, Ben Kruger, Jerry Mofokeng, Farouk Valley-Omar, Bankole Omotoso, Owen Sejaka, David Fortune, Sabata Sesiu, Moshidi Motshegwa, Nomonde Gogi, John Carson, Grethe Fox, Andre Jacobs, Johanthon Pienaar, Tertius Meintjies, Vuyelwa Nyakaza, Lentsoe Moesieleng, Kwesi L.I. Kobus, Christopher Gxalaba, Elize Meiring, Warren Lindsay, Hannes Horn, Tshamano Sebe, Reghardt van den Bergh, Johan Stassen, Johan Malherbe, Gordon van Rooyen, Duncan Lawson, Nzululwazi Mahlaka, Hans J. Heuer, Christo Loots, Duncan Lawson, Gideon de Wet, Graham Clarke, Mehboob Bawa, Susanne Beyers, Sian Erasmus , Amanda Lane, Phillip Henn, Nadira Omarjee, Vuyisile Bojana. Events climaxing in the election of South Africas first black president are the subject of Mandela and de Klerk. Its a rousing tale, with authentic locations and a spirited cast and, while the storytelling has only slightly more depth than a history pageant, its a tale deserving wider exposure to U.S. audiences. Sidney Poitier stars as Nelson Mandela, who rose from a lifetime sentence for treason to election as president more than 25 years later. Michael Caine, sporting a bald pate and an uneasy Afrikaans accent, plays South African politician F.W. de Klerk, who, as president, declared an end to the countrys longstanding policy of apartheid in 1992. Two years later, de Klerk was succeeded in office by Mandela , both having shared the Nobel Peace Prize for their roles in uniting their countrys native and white populations. In leading subordinate roles are Gerry Maritz, playing conservative South African president P.W. Botha (whom de Klerk succeeded); Jeffrey Mofokeng as Mandelas fellow political prisoner Walter Sisulu; Ian Roberts as Minister of Justice Kobie Coetsee; and American actress Tina Lifford as Mandelas wife, Winnie, whose own fight for equal rights took a more militaristic bent than her husbands. The Coetsee character and prison guard Sgt. Gregory (Ben Kruger) are used to represent the white South Africans sympathetic to Mandelas cause, balancing depiction of white supremacists pillaging black townships. Director Joseph Sargent cleverly combines original and archival footage, and the vidpic has an impressive look, thanks to cinematographer Tobias Schliessler, production designer David Barkham and costume designer Diana Cilliers. Much of the acting is a bit stiff (hence the pageant feel), though Caine loosens up a bit. Poitier is convincing enough, if one is willing to believe that Mandela was an almost relentlessly noble character, at least from 1956, when Mandela and de Klerk begins. --- Todd Everett

Mandela and de Klerk (Sun. (16), 8-10 p.m., Showtime) Filmed in South Africa by Showtime Networks in association with Hallmark Entertainment. Producer, Bernie Sofronski; co-producer, Cedric Scott; line producers, Michael L. Games, David Wicht; director, Joseph Sargent; script, Richard Wesley; camera, Tobias Schliessler; editor, Benjamin A. Weissman, Debra Karen; production designer, David Barkham; costumes, Diana Cilliers; sound, Alan Gerhardt; music, Cedric Gradus-Samson; casting, Moonyeenn Lee. Cast: Sidney Poitier, Michael Caine, Tina Lifford, Gerry Maritz, Ian Roberts, Terry Norton, Ben Kruger, Jerry Mofokeng, Farouk Valley-Omar, Bankole Omotoso, Owen Sejaka, David Fortune, Sabata Sesiu, Moshidi Motshegwa, Nomonde Gogi, John Carson, Grethe Fox, Andre Jacobs, Johanthon Pienaar, Tertius Meintjies, Vuyelwa Nyakaza, Lentsoe Moesieleng, Kwesi L.I. Kobus, Christopher Gxalaba, Elize Meiring, Warren Lindsay, Hannes Horn, Tshamano Sebe, Reghardt van den Bergh, Johan Stassen, Johan Malherbe, Gordon van Rooyen, Duncan Lawson, Nzululwazi Mahlaka, Hans J. Heuer, Christo Loots, Duncan Lawson, Gideon de Wet, Graham Clarke, Mehboob Bawa, Susanne Beyers, Sian Erasmus , Amanda Lane, Phillip Henn, Nadira Omarjee, Vuyisile Bojana. Events climaxing in the election of South Africas first black president are the subject of Mandela and de Klerk. Its a rousing tale, with authentic locations and a spirited cast and, while the storytelling has only slightly more depth than a history pageant, its a tale deserving wider exposure to U.S. audiences. Sidney Poitier stars as Nelson Mandela, who rose from a lifetime sentence for treason to election as president more than 25 years later. Michael Caine, sporting a bald pate and an uneasy Afrikaans accent, plays South African politician F.W. de Klerk, who, as president, declared an end to the countrys longstanding policy of apartheid in 1992. Two years later, de Klerk was succeeded in office by Mandela , both having shared the Nobel Peace Prize for their roles in uniting their countrys native and white populations. In leading subordinate roles are Gerry Maritz, playing conservative South African president P.W. Botha (whom de Klerk succeeded); Jeffrey Mofokeng as Mandelas fellow political prisoner Walter Sisulu; Ian Roberts as Minister of Justice Kobie Coetsee; and American actress Tina Lifford as Mandelas wife, Winnie, whose own fight for equal rights took a more militaristic bent than her husbands. The Coetsee character and prison guard Sgt. Gregory (Ben Kruger) are used to represent the white South Africans sympathetic to Mandelas cause, balancing depiction of white supremacists pillaging black townships. Director Joseph Sargent cleverly combines original and archival footage, and the vidpic has an impressive look, thanks to cinematographer Tobias Schliessler, production designer David Barkham and costume designer Diana Cilliers. Much of the acting is a bit stiff (hence the pageant feel), though Caine loosens up a bit. Poitier is convincing enough, if one is willing to believe that Mandela was an almost relentlessly noble character, at least from 1956, when Mandela and de Klerk begins. — Todd Everett

Mandela and de Klerk

Sun. (16), 8-10 p.m., Showtime

Production

Filmed in South Africa by Showtime Networks in association with Hallmark Entertainment. Producer, Bernie Sofronski; co-producer, Cedric Scott; line producers, Michael L. Games, David Wicht; director, Joseph Sargent; script, Richard Wesley.

Cast

Cast: Sidney Poitier, Michael Caine, Tina Lifford, Gerry Maritz, Ian Roberts, Terry Norton, Ben Kruger, Jerry Mofokeng, Farouk Valley-Omar, Bankole Omotoso, Owen Sejaka, David Fortune, Sabata Sesiu, Moshidi Motshegwa, Nomonde Gogi, John Carson, Grethe Fox, Andre Jacobs, Johanthon Pienaar, Tertius Meintjies, Vuyelwa Nyakaza, Lentsoe Moesieleng, Kwesi L.I. Kobus, Christopher Gxalaba, Elize Meiring, Warren Lindsay, Hannes Horn, Tshamano Sebe, Reghardt van den Bergh, Johan Stassen, Johan Malherbe, Gordon van Rooyen, Duncan Lawson, Nzululwazi Mahlaka, Hans J. Heuer, Christo Loots, Duncan Lawson, Gideon de Wet, Graham Clarke, Mehboob Bawa, Susanne Beyers, Sian Erasmus, Amanda Lane, Phillip Henn, Nadira Omarjee, Vuyisile Bojana.
Camera, Tobias Schliessler; editor, Benjamin A. Weissman, Debra Karen; production designer, David Barkham; costumes, Diana Cilliers; sound, Alan Gerhardt; music, Cedric Gradus-Samson; casting, Moonyeenn Lee.

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