Hollywood and the News (Tues. (7), 9:30-10 p.m., AMC) Filmed by American Movie Classics. Executive producers, Nick Clooney, David Roofthooft; creator, Clooney; director, Roofthooft; camera, Joe Civolis; editor, Richard A. Fernandes; music, Peitor Angell, Bongos of Domani Music Prods. With: Tom Brokaw, Dan Rather, Diane Sawyer, Bernard Shaw, Barbara Walters. While it's commendable that cablenet American Movie Classics tries to spice up its sked with original programming, this superficial look at how Hollywood portrays the media is a thin attempt at what the press materials call a "documentary." Interviewer/host Nick Clooney has gathered five of the most well-known and respected broadcast journalists in the business, shown them film clips (ranging from "The Front Page" to "Gentleman's Agreement" to "All the President's Men," with a heavy dose of "Broadcast News") and asked them, Gee, does this stuff really happen? The vets offer candid opinions, with NBC's Tom Brokaw exhibiting his oft-concealed dry wit, Dan Rather being, well, Dan Rather, and Diane Sawyer offering up several fun behind-the-scenes anecdotes about her former boss, legendary "60 Minutes" producer Don Hewitt. When asked about reporters who will do anything for a story, CNN's stately Bernard Shaw says, "We become more principled with responsibility" a chilling statement in this ultra-competitive day and age. But most of the docu features the various journos telling Clooney that no, reporters don't have time to drink and carouse anymore and that yes, competition among the myriad news outlets has changed the world of journalism. The main fault of the show? By literally taking these films as films about the media, the political and philosophical agendas of each picture are ignored. "Broadcast News" is not an inside look at the world it's set in, but a comedic look at the neuroses of the characters of Holly Hunter and Albert Brooks. It could have been set in almost any high-stakes professional world. Thefilms used as examples are not trying to make points about the media, but about loneliness, or being Jewish, or the nature of power. So just rent "The China Syndrome" or "All the President's Men" and enjoy. Carole Horst

Hollywood and the News (Tues. (7), 9:30-10 p.m., AMC) Filmed by American Movie Classics. Executive producers, Nick Clooney, David Roofthooft; creator, Clooney; director, Roofthooft; camera, Joe Civolis; editor, Richard A. Fernandes; music, Peitor Angell, Bongos of Domani Music Prods. With: Tom Brokaw, Dan Rather, Diane Sawyer, Bernard Shaw, Barbara Walters. While it’s commendable that cablenet American Movie Classics tries to spice up its sked with original programming, this superficial look at how Hollywood portrays the media is a thin attempt at what the press materials call a “documentary.” Interviewer/host Nick Clooney has gathered five of the most well-known and respected broadcast journalists in the business, shown them film clips (ranging from “The Front Page” to “Gentleman’s Agreement” to “All the President’s Men,” with a heavy dose of “Broadcast News”) and asked them, Gee, does this stuff really happen? The vets offer candid opinions, with NBC’s Tom Brokaw exhibiting his oft-concealed dry wit, Dan Rather being, well, Dan Rather, and Diane Sawyer offering up several fun behind-the-scenes anecdotes about her former boss, legendary “60 Minutes” producer Don Hewitt. When asked about reporters who will do anything for a story, CNN’s stately Bernard Shaw says, “We become more principled with responsibility” a chilling statement in this ultra-competitive day and age. But most of the docu features the various journos telling Clooney that no, reporters don’t have time to drink and carouse anymore and that yes, competition among the myriad news outlets has changed the world of journalism. The main fault of the show? By literally taking these films as films about the media, the political and philosophical agendas of each picture are ignored. “Broadcast News” is not an inside look at the world it’s set in, but a comedic look at the neuroses of the characters of Holly Hunter and Albert Brooks. It could have been set in almost any high-stakes professional world. Thefilms used as examples are not trying to make points about the media, but about loneliness, or being Jewish, or the nature of power. So just rent “The China Syndrome” or “All the President’s Men” and enjoy. Carole Horst

Hollywood and the News

Tues. (7), 9:30-10 p.m., AMC

Production

Filmed by American Movie Classics. Executive producers, Nick Clooney, David Roofthooft; creator, Clooney; director, Roofthooft.

Crew

Camera, Joe Civolis; editor, Richard A. Fernandes; music, Peitor Angell, Bongos of Domani Music Prods.

Cast

With: Tom Brokaw, Dan Rather, Diane Sawyer, Bernard Shaw, Barbara Walters.
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