Dave Davies (LunaPark; 225 capacity; $ 10) Presented by Paul Rock and LunaPark. Band: Davies, Danny Magu, David Jenkins, Jim Laspesa, Andrew Sandoval. Reviewed April 21, 1997. Brother acts rarely find two siblings on equal footing. For every set of Everlys and Allmans, there's a dozen versions of the Knopflers, the Van Halens and the Wilsons --- willing participants keen on executing one sibling's vision. And only recently, with the antics of Oasis' Gallaghers, have we been reminded of how much fun the media can have when brotherly love heads south. Who better to be the guide than Dave Davies? As the brother of Ray and lead guitarist of the Kinks, Dave's name crops up in details of turmoil and feuds. His desired spots in the limelight have come a whopping twice in the band's 33-year history --- on the hit "Death of a Clown" and crowd fave "I'm Not Like Everyone Else" --- and his three solo albums have done little beyond showing him the way back into the band. Coincidentally, within the last year Ray and Dave have had autobiographies published, assembled solo acts, and seen the indie release of "To the Bone," an admirable "Kinks Kronikles" for the '90s. But where Ray used the opportunity to spill his guts through anecdotes and songs, Dave has assembled a pumped-up 90-minute show of Kinks hits and solo obscurities , with one new tune (think "Muswell Hillbillies," English dance hall and an unending stream of verses) thrown in as a signal of contemporary vitality. Songs dating back 20 years and more --- "Dead End Street," "All Day and All of the Night," "Strangers," "Get Back in the Line" --- were performed at what he termed "the first rehearsal" with a decent level of enthusiasm and energy. But the performance lacked the perspective only he could provide: the view from his longtime spot behind the leader. As Dave moves to the frontman slot on this, his first solo tour, he seemingly wants the old role forgotten, as if he had taken over his brother's garage band. His hired hands are sufficiently rehearsed, and they hammer home all those glorious barre chords and riffs with the requisite tightness. Dave alternates between electric and acoustic guitar, rarely soloing, and sets up textures that could resemble pre-production tapes from any moment in the Kinks' history. The whine in his voice has been tempered, and if that makes him sound a little too much like Ray, so be it --- he'd have to thoroughly revamp these numbers if he wanted to make a statement, and that doesn't appear to be in the Davies' songbook. Dave Davies performs May 1 at the House of Blues on a bill with the Smithereens.

Dave Davies (LunaPark; 225 capacity; $ 10) Presented by Paul Rock and LunaPark. Band: Davies, Danny Magu, David Jenkins, Jim Laspesa, Andrew Sandoval. Reviewed April 21, 1997. Brother acts rarely find two siblings on equal footing. For every set of Everlys and Allmans, there’s a dozen versions of the Knopflers, the Van Halens and the Wilsons — willing participants keen on executing one sibling’s vision. And only recently, with the antics of Oasis’ Gallaghers, have we been reminded of how much fun the media can have when brotherly love heads south. Who better to be the guide than Dave Davies? As the brother of Ray and lead guitarist of the Kinks, Dave’s name crops up in details of turmoil and feuds. His desired spots in the limelight have come a whopping twice in the band’s 33-year history — on the hit “Death of a Clown” and crowd fave “I’m Not Like Everyone Else” — and his three solo albums have done little beyond showing him the way back into the band. Coincidentally, within the last year Ray and Dave have had autobiographies published, assembled solo acts, and seen the indie release of “To the Bone,” an admirable “Kinks Kronikles” for the ’90s. But where Ray used the opportunity to spill his guts through anecdotes and songs, Dave has assembled a pumped-up 90-minute show of Kinks hits and solo obscurities , with one new tune (think “Muswell Hillbillies,” English dance hall and an unending stream of verses) thrown in as a signal of contemporary vitality. Songs dating back 20 years and more — “Dead End Street,” “All Day and All of the Night,” “Strangers,” “Get Back in the Line” — were performed at what he termed “the first rehearsal” with a decent level of enthusiasm and energy. But the performance lacked the perspective only he could provide: the view from his longtime spot behind the leader. As Dave moves to the frontman slot on this, his first solo tour, he seemingly wants the old role forgotten, as if he had taken over his brother’s garage band. His hired hands are sufficiently rehearsed, and they hammer home all those glorious barre chords and riffs with the requisite tightness. Dave alternates between electric and acoustic guitar, rarely soloing, and sets up textures that could resemble pre-production tapes from any moment in the Kinks’ history. The whine in his voice has been tempered, and if that makes him sound a little too much like Ray, so be it — he’d have to thoroughly revamp these numbers if he wanted to make a statement, and that doesn’t appear to be in the Davies’ songbook. Dave Davies performs May 1 at the House of Blues on a bill with the Smithereens.

Dave Davies

LunaPark; 225 capacity; $10

Production

Presented by Paul Rock and LunaPark

Cast

Band: Davies, Danny Magu, David Jenkins, Jim Laspesa, Andrew Sandoval. Reviewed April 21, 1997.
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