A'90s relative of the fine relationship comedies Swedish director Lasse Hallstrom made at the start of his career in the '70s, "Adam & Eve" is an appealing and funny look at the trouble men and women have staying together. Universal theme and cinematic qualities should give it sizable chances in offshore markets. Writer-directors Mans Herngren and Hannes Holm --- who made their feature debut two years ago with the successful "One in a Million" --- have based the film on their own experiences of relationships falling apart and unfaithfulness as a means of consolation.

A’90s relative of the fine relationship comedies Swedish director Lasse Hallstrom made at the start of his career in the ’70s, “Adam & Eve” is an appealing and funny look at the trouble men and women have staying together. Universal theme and cinematic qualities should give it sizable chances in offshore markets.

Writer-directors Mans Herngren and Hannes Holm — who made their feature debut two years ago with the successful “One in a Million” — have based the film on their own experiences of relationships falling apart and unfaithfulness as a means of consolation.

In the film’s first scene — deliberately in the style of some overblown Hollywood movie’s ending — Adam (Bjorn Kjellman) meets Eva (Josefin Nilsson) and the two instantly fall in love. Four years later, they’re living together, but boredom has already set in. She wants to marry and have kids; he’s started thinking about being unfaithful. He gets his chance and begins a relationship with a very young woman.

When Eva eventually discovers it, she blows her top and the pair separate. By the time Adam realizes Eva was his only true love, she’s already found a new boyfriend and is preparing to get married.

There’s nothing earth-shaking in the story, but Herngren and Holm handle it in such a charming fashion that it feels almost new. The situations and the dialogue are shot through with comedy and a sense of connection to true-life experiences.

But pic’s main plus is the way in which, from the striking opening onward, the helming duo use the medium in a highly cinematic way. One very funny scene, in which Adam daydreams a nightmarish vision of married life with two kids, is told as a composite of several well-known TV commercials.

Acting is mostly very good, with singer Nilsson surprisingly at ease surrounded by experienced thesps. Tech credits are all tops

Adam & Eve

Swedish

Production

A Svensk Filmindustri release (in Sweden) of a Svensk Filmindustri production, in association with Swedish Television Drama. (International sales: Svensk Filmindustri, Stockholm.) Produced by Waldemar Bergendahl. Directed, written by Mans Herngren, Hannes Holm

Crew

Camera (color), Mats Olofsson; editor, Sofia Lindgren; music, Dan Sundqvist; art direction, Mikael Varhely; sound (Dolby SR Digital), Wille Peterson-Berger, Jean-Frederic Axelsson. Reviewed at Svensk Filmindustri screening room, Stockholm, Jan. 30, 1997. (In Gothenburg Film Festival.) Running time: 94 MIN.

With

Adam ..... Bjorn Kjellman Eva ..... Josefin Nilsson Tove ..... Tintin Anderzon Ake ..... Jacob Ericksson Sven ..... Reine Brynolfsson Kicki ..... Katrin Sundberg Jackie ..... Dubrilla Ekerlund Pidde ..... Mans Herngren Palle ..... Hannes Holm Eva's Father ..... Tomas von Bromssen Eva's Mother ..... Greten Andersson Eva's Brother ..... Kalle Moraeus
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