Filmed in Nashville by Delilah Films in association with the Disney Channel. Producer, Stephanie Bennett; co-producer, Kathy Blake; directors, Stephen R. Monroe, Alan Boyd; camera, Monroe; editors, Boyd, Tom Mitchell; sound, Thomas Morrison. Guests: Willie Nelson, Toby Keith, Timothy B. Schmidt, Tammy Wynette, Collin Raye, Jim Scholten, James House, Rodney Crowell, Lorrie Morgan. This Disney spec (and the accompanying album) is no doubt inspired by the successful disc a few years back of country music artists warbling nuggets from the Eagles repertoire, and covers much the same territory. It features a reunited Beach Boys joining forces with the likes of Willie Nelson, Toby Keith and Lorrie Morgan to put a countrified spin on the band's classics. While it's interesting to watch a usually stoic Brian Wilson exude enthusiasm, work the musical magic that he's known for and give his unbridled seal of approval to Timothy B. Schmidt's version of "Caroline, No," much of spec trods ground likely to be familiar to the cursory and die-hard Beach Boys fans. Many of the spec's tunes are also contained in the River North Records disc "The Beach Boys: Stars & Stripes Vol. 1," and country music channels have been playing ad nauseum the band's joint-effort music video with crooner Doug Supernaw on a goofy version of Lyle Lovett's "Long Tall Texan." As a result, the uniqueness of Brian reuniting and performing with the Boys for the first time in more than a decade and his presence on the spec may lack some impact. Spec is also peppered with the band members often dryly revisiting how some of the tunes were created, the joys of being an American icon and still rocking at age 50-plus, and how the guests measured up on the band's reworked offerings. Brian's suggestion that "we sound better today than we did 35 years ago" is a telling remark and ranks as one of the show's more amusing as well as interesting observations of the day. But most of the recollections sound like the millionth retelling and largely lack any spark. Musical highlights include Schmidt's pristine version and Toby Keith's take on "Be True To Your School," whose message in the musically urbanized '90s seems surprisingly dated, despite Keith's growly interpretation. Directors Stephen Monroe and Alan Boyd successfully capture the camaraderie between the Boys and their visitors, and editors Boyd and Tom Mitchell weave the action into a fast-paced presentation. But the result is more a slick marketing vehicle and an only marginally enjoyable show. Adam Sandler

Filmed in Nashville by Delilah Films in association with the Disney Channel. Producer, Stephanie Bennett; co-producer, Kathy Blake; directors, Stephen R. Monroe, Alan Boyd; camera, Monroe; editors, Boyd, Tom Mitchell; sound, Thomas Morrison. Guests: Willie Nelson, Toby Keith, Timothy B. Schmidt, Tammy Wynette, Collin Raye, Jim Scholten, James House, Rodney Crowell, Lorrie Morgan. This Disney spec (and the accompanying album) is no doubt inspired by the successful disc a few years back of country music artists warbling nuggets from the Eagles repertoire, and covers much the same territory. It features a reunited Beach Boys joining forces with the likes of Willie Nelson, Toby Keith and Lorrie Morgan to put a countrified spin on the band’s classics. While it’s interesting to watch a usually stoic Brian Wilson exude enthusiasm, work the musical magic that he’s known for and give his unbridled seal of approval to Timothy B. Schmidt’s version of “Caroline, No,” much of spec trods ground likely to be familiar to the cursory and die-hard Beach Boys fans. Many of the spec’s tunes are also contained in the River North Records disc “The Beach Boys: Stars & Stripes Vol. 1,” and country music channels have been playing ad nauseum the band’s joint-effort music video with crooner Doug Supernaw on a goofy version of Lyle Lovett’s “Long Tall Texan.” As a result, the uniqueness of Brian reuniting and performing with the Boys for the first time in more than a decade and his presence on the spec may lack some impact. Spec is also peppered with the band members often dryly revisiting how some of the tunes were created, the joys of being an American icon and still rocking at age 50-plus, and how the guests measured up on the band’s reworked offerings. Brian’s suggestion that “we sound better today than we did 35 years ago” is a telling remark and ranks as one of the show’s more amusing as well as interesting observations of the day. But most of the recollections sound like the millionth retelling and largely lack any spark. Musical highlights include Schmidt’s pristine version and Toby Keith’s take on “Be True To Your School,” whose message in the musically urbanized ’90s seems surprisingly dated, despite Keith’s growly interpretation. Directors Stephen Monroe and Alan Boyd successfully capture the camaraderie between the Boys and their visitors, and editors Boyd and Tom Mitchell weave the action into a fast-paced presentation. But the result is more a slick marketing vehicle and an only marginally enjoyable show. Adam Sandler

The Beach Boys: Nashville Sounds

(Sat (23); 10-11p.m.; Disney)

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