Review: ‘k.d.lang’

A few of those go a long way in a two-hour performance, and lang had the showmanship to incorporate a fair amount of contrasting material -- songs from what she referred to her "other life" as a country singer including a reading of Joe South's perky "Rose Garden" and her own hoedown "Paydirt." She added (more seriously) Roger Miller's ballad "Lock, Stock and Teardrops" and a powerful rendition of Roy Orbison's "Crying"-- torchy, though, where Orbison's had been operatic.

A few of those go a long way in a two-hour performance, and lang had the showmanship to incorporate a fair amount of contrasting material — songs from what she referred to her “other life” as a country singer including a reading of Joe South’s perky “Rose Garden” and her own hoedown “Paydirt.” She added (more seriously) Roger Miller’s ballad “Lock, Stock and Teardrops” and a powerful rendition of Roy Orbison’s “Crying”– torchy, though, where Orbison’s had been operatic.

The singer’s between-songs conversation played with her identity as a comfortably “out” lesbian without making it the point of her show, and kidded her demographically wide (though a bit older than usual) audience as “a convention of the unconventional.”

Her band, led by keyboardist Darrell Smith, was superb, sounding (thanks also to particularly good p.a. work) at least as good as a record.

k.d.lang

Production

Friday's show, the first of two nearly sold-out nights, covered ground from lang's early material through hefty chunks of her current Warner Bros. album "All You Can Eat" and its 1992 predecessor, "Ingenue." Both of which, including such well-known songs as "Constant Craving" and the show-opening "Sexuality," showcase lang's slow, yearning original ballads.
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