Review: ‘The Shot’

A stale satire of the movie biz from the p.o.v. of actors who are out of work for good reason, "The Shot" doesn't come close to its target. Lensed in 14 days for less than $ 40,000, pic is too marginal even for the most far-reaching indie-oriented fests and is thus being four-walled by the producers for an L.A. run starting Feb. 2. It won't be around long.

A stale satire of the movie biz from the p.o.v. of actors who are out of work for good reason, “The Shot” doesn’t come close to its target. Lensed in 14 days for less than $ 40,000, pic is too marginal even for the most far-reaching indie-oriented fests and is thus being four-walled by the producers for an L.A. run starting Feb. 2. It won’t be around long.

Not that it would increase its business by one ticket, but this unpolished effort about two klutzes who steal reels of a major new film for ransom found itself with an inadvertent publicity tie-in last week with the theft from LAX baggage claim of 10 rolls of recently shot footage from Kevin Spacey’s directorial debut (since returned).

Unfortunately, here it takes most of the picture to get around to the action, as the initial stretches are devoted to endless complaining and unsympathetic strategizing on the part of the slovenly Dern Reel (writer-director Dan Bell) and Patrick St. Patrick (Michael Rivkin), cheerfully desperate types who feel that the industry owes them a break.

The object of everyone’s resentment is Hollywood’s biggest director, three-time Oscar winner David Egoman, with the character’s oft-repeated name serving as an accurate barometer of the script’s wit level. Kiwi director Vincent Ward pops in and out as a filmmaker who claims that Egoman has stolen his script, while Dern and Patrick eventually hatch their plot to snatch a work print from Egoman’s home during a private screening.

Based on his own play that Bell staged in L.A. seven years ago, “The Shot” possesses neither credibility nor humor, for reasons that begin with the fact that it doesn’t remotely respect fundamental truths about how Hollywood works. A fair number of scenes relate to final post-production, release schedules, studio executive work and the like, but bear no relation to reality. Satire that can’t even ground itself properlyby accurately portraying the butt of its jokes doesn’t have a prayer.

Script provides the viewer with no reason to get behind the dim exploits of the lead duo, and neither do the actors. Dana Carvey is flagged down on the street to schmooze for a minute, clearly doing the filmmakers a favor. Soundtrack includes a goodly number of songs, but tech aspects are otherwise rough, particularly the clumsily mixed sound.

The Shot

Production

A Bread & Water Prods. presentation. Produced by Jude Horowitz, Sherrie Rose. Co-producer, Penny Franks. Directed, written by Dan Bell, based on his play.

Crew

Camera (Foto-Kem color, 16 mm), Alan Caudillo; editor, Kevin Greutert; music, Dan Sonis; songs, Morely Bartnof, Andy Krikun; production design, Diamond Jim Braverman; sound (Ultra-Stereo), Ben Patrick; assistant director, Sam Hill. Reviewed on videocassette, L.A., Jan. 31, 1996. Running time: 84 MIN.

With

Dern Reel - Dan Bell
Patrick St. Patrick - Michael Rivkin
Anna - Jude Horowitz
Bob Mann - Michael DeLuise
Sheila Ricks - Mo Gaffney
Detective Markinson - Jack Kehler
Detective Corelli - Ted Raimi
Smith - Vincent Ward
Metaphor Man - Bob Dickman
Sissy Mayron - Tracy Arnold
Doughnut - Lee Tergesen
Dana Carvey - Dana Carvey
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading