Hidden In America (Sun. (1), 8-10 p.m., Showtime) Filmed in Toronto by Citadel Entertainment/AsIs Prods. and the End Hunger Net. Executive producers, Jeff Bridges, Neil Koenigsberg; producers, David R. Ginsburg, Fred Berner; director, Martin Bell; writers, Peter Silverman, Michael de Guzman; camera, James R. Bagdonas; editor, Nancy Baker; production designer, Ed Hanna; art director, Terry Wareham; sound, Urmas Rosin; music, Mason Daring; casting, Beth Klein, Clare Walker (Toronto). Running time: 2 hours. Cast: Beau Bridges, Bruce Davison, Shelton Dane, Jena Malone, Alice Krige, Josef Sommer, Frances McDormand ,Jeff Bridges, Allegra Denton, Dan Petronijevic, Nick Johne, Nicky Guadagni, LiisaRepo-Martell, Pixie Bigelow, James Kidnie, Brenda Bazinet, Marvin Ishmael, Judy Enns, Kathryn Winslow, Michael Caruana, J.J. Evans, Norma Clarke, Brock Johnson, Nadia Litz, Ferne Downey, Soo Garay, Nathalie Tordjman-Goodfellow, Athena Tordjman-Goodfellow, Joe Pingue, Michael Donaghue, Kathryn Haggis, Debra Kirshenbaum, William Colgate, Michael Copeman, Gil Garratt, Herbie Barnes. Writers Peter Silverman and Michael de Guzman and director Martin Bell deliver a first-rate vidpic about a terrible contemporary problem; they're spotlighting in dramatic terms the hunger and poverty choking working-class people in today's USA. Partially produced by the End Hunger Network, a nonprofit org working with show folks on projects to relieve hunger, "Hidden in America" plays as a classy drama. Beau Bridges shines as Bill Januson, a widower who spent his last dime on his wife's medical care and is now beset by poverty and grief. Januson has two fine youngsters, Robbie (Shelton Dane) and Willa (Jena Malone). A 17-year GM assembly-line grad with no high school diploma or special moneymaking talents, he's grabbing whatever he can. Now he's flipping hamburgers for his kids' living. Nine-year-old Willa's got an intermittent cough, while intelligent Robbie, 11, pulls his weight as part of the team. Caroline (Allegra Denton), Willa's best friend, daughter of super-nice Dr. Michael Millerton (Bruce Davison), regularly invites Willa over to the big house to play. And for an occasional meal. The good Millertons could be out of Louisa May Alcott, what with their kindness and inexperience. When Januson loses his job and has no prospects, the Millertons try being sympathetic, and Januson resents it. Genteel Mrs. Millerton (Alice Krige), spotting Willa copping some food to take home, bravely if mistakenly says nothing, and Dr. Millerton invites Willa, Robbie and Bill to a Sunday barbecue (to which Januson says no out of discomfort and pride). Januson works odd jobs until they're gone. Robbie hooks up with a good, strong character, mechanic Gus (Frances McDormand), with whom he concocts a sure-money plan. Januson's dead broke, and no one but Robbie and Willa seems to care about that. With nothing to eat, Januson accepts the next Millerton meal invite. But it's excruciatingly awkward, the Millerton in-laws proving snooty. The good doctor hasn't had the brights to find a hospital job for unskilled Januson, but pass the biscuits. The script's major flaw is how out of touch the Millertons are with the Janusons' situation. They mean well, but they're nincompoops. This is Januson's story, and Silverman and de Guzman should stick to it. But if the Millertons are pallid and the ending's artificial, the telefilm still boasts naturalist touches reminiscent of Zola or Upton Sinclair, thanks to the beautifully realized Januson menage. Davison's doctor, neatly understated, denotes good intentions but helplessness. Young Dane, as shining-eyed Robbie, is terrif, and Malone, as Willa, performs ably. Krige's Mrs. Millerton is pleasantly silken. Co-exec producer Jeff Bridges, as Millerton's medical partner, plays it sincere. McDormand's tough Gus is a gem, and Liisa Repo-Martell, as her friend Angela, is just fine. Denton, playing young Caroline, is lovely, and Pixie Bigelow, as a Millerton relative, nicely zings in some less-than-subtle viciousness. Production designer Ed Hanna has done an outstanding job, and Nancy Baker's editing is superior. James R. Bagdonas' camerawork sets moods and employs goodcomposition. Mason Daring's interesting score supports the drama, which, while lamenting hunger and joblessness in what's inferably the U.S., was filmed in Toronto. Tony Scott

Hidden In America (Sun. (1), 8-10 p.m., Showtime) Filmed in Toronto by Citadel Entertainment/AsIs Prods. and the End Hunger Net. Executive producers, Jeff Bridges, Neil Koenigsberg; producers, David R. Ginsburg, Fred Berner; director, Martin Bell; writers, Peter Silverman, Michael de Guzman; camera, James R. Bagdonas; editor, Nancy Baker; production designer, Ed Hanna; art director, Terry Wareham; sound, Urmas Rosin; music, Mason Daring; casting, Beth Klein, Clare Walker (Toronto). Running time: 2 hours. Cast: Beau Bridges, Bruce Davison, Shelton Dane, Jena Malone, Alice Krige, Josef Sommer, Frances McDormand ,Jeff Bridges, Allegra Denton, Dan Petronijevic, Nick Johne, Nicky Guadagni, LiisaRepo-Martell, Pixie Bigelow, James Kidnie, Brenda Bazinet, Marvin Ishmael, Judy Enns, Kathryn Winslow, Michael Caruana, J.J. Evans, Norma Clarke, Brock Johnson, Nadia Litz, Ferne Downey, Soo Garay, Nathalie Tordjman-Goodfellow, Athena Tordjman-Goodfellow, Joe Pingue, Michael Donaghue, Kathryn Haggis, Debra Kirshenbaum, William Colgate, Michael Copeman, Gil Garratt, Herbie Barnes. Writers Peter Silverman and Michael de Guzman and director Martin Bell deliver a first-rate vidpic about a terrible contemporary problem; they’re spotlighting in dramatic terms the hunger and poverty choking working-class people in today’s USA. Partially produced by the End Hunger Network, a nonprofit org working with show folks on projects to relieve hunger, “Hidden in America” plays as a classy drama. Beau Bridges shines as Bill Januson, a widower who spent his last dime on his wife’s medical care and is now beset by poverty and grief. Januson has two fine youngsters, Robbie (Shelton Dane) and Willa (Jena Malone). A 17-year GM assembly-line grad with no high school diploma or special moneymaking talents, he’s grabbing whatever he can. Now he’s flipping hamburgers for his kids’ living. Nine-year-old Willa’s got an intermittent cough, while intelligent Robbie, 11, pulls his weight as part of the team. Caroline (Allegra Denton), Willa’s best friend, daughter of super-nice Dr. Michael Millerton (Bruce Davison), regularly invites Willa over to the big house to play. And for an occasional meal. The good Millertons could be out of Louisa May Alcott, what with their kindness and inexperience. When Januson loses his job and has no prospects, the Millertons try being sympathetic, and Januson resents it. Genteel Mrs. Millerton (Alice Krige), spotting Willa copping some food to take home, bravely if mistakenly says nothing, and Dr. Millerton invites Willa, Robbie and Bill to a Sunday barbecue (to which Januson says no out of discomfort and pride). Januson works odd jobs until they’re gone. Robbie hooks up with a good, strong character, mechanic Gus (Frances McDormand), with whom he concocts a sure-money plan. Januson’s dead broke, and no one but Robbie and Willa seems to care about that. With nothing to eat, Januson accepts the next Millerton meal invite. But it’s excruciatingly awkward, the Millerton in-laws proving snooty. The good doctor hasn’t had the brights to find a hospital job for unskilled Januson, but pass the biscuits. The script’s major flaw is how out of touch the Millertons are with the Janusons’ situation. They mean well, but they’re nincompoops. This is Januson’s story, and Silverman and de Guzman should stick to it. But if the Millertons are pallid and the ending’s artificial, the telefilm still boasts naturalist touches reminiscent of Zola or Upton Sinclair, thanks to the beautifully realized Januson menage. Davison’s doctor, neatly understated, denotes good intentions but helplessness. Young Dane, as shining-eyed Robbie, is terrif, and Malone, as Willa, performs ably. Krige’s Mrs. Millerton is pleasantly silken. Co-exec producer Jeff Bridges, as Millerton’s medical partner, plays it sincere. McDormand’s tough Gus is a gem, and Liisa Repo-Martell, as her friend Angela, is just fine. Denton, playing young Caroline, is lovely, and Pixie Bigelow, as a Millerton relative, nicely zings in some less-than-subtle viciousness. Production designer Ed Hanna has done an outstanding job, and Nancy Baker’s editing is superior. James R. Bagdonas’ camerawork sets moods and employs goodcomposition. Mason Daring’s interesting score supports the drama, which, while lamenting hunger and joblessness in what’s inferably the U.S., was filmed in Toronto. Tony Scott

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