Football America (Fri. (18), 10 p.m.-midnight, TNT) Filmed by NFL Films. Executive producer, Steve Sabol; producer/director, Phil Tuckett; segment producers, Bob Angelo, Chris Barlow, Greg Kohs, Suzanne Morgan, Sabol, David Swain, Tuckett; writer, Ray Didinger; camera, Steve Andrich, Bob Carmichael, Donald Marx, Hank McElwee, Dave Sharples, Dave Dart; editor, Jeff Hillegass; sound, Vince Caputo, Jerry Mahler; music, Tom Hedden, Dave Robidoux, Mahler. NFL Films presents another fine docu, with its trademark top-rate sports photography , about America's favorite sport this time shunning the pros and big universities to concentrate on people who really do play for the love of the game. No one is tougher than the deaf team fielded by Gallaudet U., or the kids in Juneau, Alaska, who raise $ 80,000 a year from the community to keep the program running, or the prisoners of Graterford Prison who use the prison league as a link to their "normal" lives left behind. Deft segments profile the unsung heroes of football in America. All are special, but highlights include Dot Murphy, the only female college coach. Murphy, in tandem with husband/head coach Gene, is the receivers coach at championship Hinds Community College in Mississippi. She's also a mother of three and the academic advisor for the kids; she's passionate and tough, and the guys respect her. Then there's Bob Blechen, a computer scientist. Blechen plays semi-pro ball. Blechen is 6 feet, 6 inches tall and weighs 290 pounds. Blechen is 60 years old. He played for George Allen when he coached the Whittier College team and the Detroit Lions and still strikes the fear of God and awe into his twentysomething opponents and teammates. With properly authoritative narration from James Coburn (you hardly miss John Facenda) and an insightful script from sportswriter Ray Didinger, "Football America" gets under the skin of the game, a game that asks its 320 -pound lineman to possess the nimble feet and grace of Baryshnikov and its 190 -pound tailbacks for the strength of a locomotive. It's violent and passionate, and nothing better illustrates this than the fire in the eyes of Pee Wee players or the commitment of the prisoners in Graterford, Pa., correctional institute most doing life for murder. Kudos to the individual segment producers and cameramen for their great work and storytelling. Producer/director Phil Tuckett keeps the pace as lively as a two-minute offense. The music runs a little bit into the sentimental end zone, but rest of tech credits are top-notch. Carole Horst

Football America (Fri. (18), 10 p.m.-midnight, TNT) Filmed by NFL Films. Executive producer, Steve Sabol; producer/director, Phil Tuckett; segment producers, Bob Angelo, Chris Barlow, Greg Kohs, Suzanne Morgan, Sabol, David Swain, Tuckett; writer, Ray Didinger; camera, Steve Andrich, Bob Carmichael, Donald Marx, Hank McElwee, Dave Sharples, Dave Dart; editor, Jeff Hillegass; sound, Vince Caputo, Jerry Mahler; music, Tom Hedden, Dave Robidoux, Mahler. NFL Films presents another fine docu, with its trademark top-rate sports photography , about America’s favorite sport this time shunning the pros and big universities to concentrate on people who really do play for the love of the game. No one is tougher than the deaf team fielded by Gallaudet U., or the kids in Juneau, Alaska, who raise $ 80,000 a year from the community to keep the program running, or the prisoners of Graterford Prison who use the prison league as a link to their “normal” lives left behind. Deft segments profile the unsung heroes of football in America. All are special, but highlights include Dot Murphy, the only female college coach. Murphy, in tandem with husband/head coach Gene, is the receivers coach at championship Hinds Community College in Mississippi. She’s also a mother of three and the academic advisor for the kids; she’s passionate and tough, and the guys respect her. Then there’s Bob Blechen, a computer scientist. Blechen plays semi-pro ball. Blechen is 6 feet, 6 inches tall and weighs 290 pounds. Blechen is 60 years old. He played for George Allen when he coached the Whittier College team and the Detroit Lions and still strikes the fear of God and awe into his twentysomething opponents and teammates. With properly authoritative narration from James Coburn (you hardly miss John Facenda) and an insightful script from sportswriter Ray Didinger, “Football America” gets under the skin of the game, a game that asks its 320 -pound lineman to possess the nimble feet and grace of Baryshnikov and its 190 -pound tailbacks for the strength of a locomotive. It’s violent and passionate, and nothing better illustrates this than the fire in the eyes of Pee Wee players or the commitment of the prisoners in Graterford, Pa., correctional institute most doing life for murder. Kudos to the individual segment producers and cameramen for their great work and storytelling. Producer/director Phil Tuckett keeps the pace as lively as a two-minute offense. The music runs a little bit into the sentimental end zone, but rest of tech credits are top-notch. Carole Horst

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