Every Woman's Dream (Tues. (15), 9-11 p.m., CBS) Filmed in Auckland, New Zealand, by the Kushner-Locke Co. Executive producers, Peter Locke, Donald Kushner, Janet Faust Krusi; director, Steven Schachter; writers, Martin Davidson , Schachter, William H. Macy; based on book "Deadly Pretender" by Karen Kingsbury; camera, William Wages; editor, Jim Oliver; sound, Joe Melody; music, Peter Manning Robinson; casting, Annette Benson (U.S.), Liz Mullane (N.Z.). Cast: Jeff Fahey, Kim Cattrall, DeLane Matthews, Walter Addison, Judith McConnell, Felcia Bell, Debra Eisenstadt, Paul Linke, Jay Saussey, Alexander Gander, Nicko Vella, John Sumner, Judi Douglass, John Parker, Grant Tilly, Bruce Allpress, Ross Duncan, Jon Brazier, Anthony Ray Parker, Mark Ferguson, Vicky Haughton, Sarah Boddy, Lisa Crittenden, Sterling Cathman, Amy Morrison, Brad Burnett, Callum Gallagher, Warren Carl. Narrator: Paul Linke. Seems like a simple, bordering on beguiling, story of a charming overachieving bigamist. The telefilm's early segs,with bright, off-the-cuff dialog and fast action under Steven Schacter's knowing direction, are light-hearted and merry as ambitious Mitch Parker (Jeff Fahey, who keenly defines the part) makes his way. When clouds loom, the artful study of a heel wearing down turns into dark trek down psychological lane. "Dream" has gone schizoid. Attracted to blond Candy (DeLane Matthews) in L.A., much-traveling, skirt-chasing Mitch marries her, explaining his considerable absences by saying he's in the CIA. Meeting Liz (Kim Cattrall) on a plane, he asks her to marry him and they settle down. The con man becomes, then, a dedicated commuter, loved and admired by his wives. Liz believes he's working for Disney, which is why they live in Florida and why he zips back to the West Coast so much. But he's uncovered in California, so he tells Candy they have to sneak to Florida because they're in spyish danger. She buys it, and both wives are unknowingly living in the same burg in Florida; the possibilities are as stupefying as a high-wire act. Yet it's no "Captain's Paradise" by a long shot. Writers Martin Davidson, Steven Schachter and William H. Macy restricted by basing the teleplay on a true story drag in murky elements, and Parker's even more fearsome character emerges. Finances weigh Parker down, and his own fears of inadequacy kick in. His well's bone dry, and, worse, his wives start wondering. Vidpic brings narrator Paul Linke onscreen for part of the later action and to explain what happens to Mitch. "Dreams," once flying expertly above the clouds, changes gears and falls like a stone. Jeff Fahey of the recent "The Marshall" series displays considerable charm, good timing and appeal; even his later, dangerous moods are well played. Matthews' Candy is a strong study of an innocent believer; Cattrall's more sophisticated Liz is a convincing fall-girl. Jay Saussey, playing Candy's cynical, suspicious 14-year-old daughter Samantha, is a find. William Wages' camerawork is first rate, as is designer Alfred Sole's resourceful use of Auckland's location sites. Jim Oliver's editing is superior, and Peter Manning Robinson's witty score early on, as well as his somber entries for the big letdown, are inspired. Tony Scott

Every Woman’s Dream (Tues. (15), 9-11 p.m., CBS) Filmed in Auckland, New Zealand, by the Kushner-Locke Co. Executive producers, Peter Locke, Donald Kushner, Janet Faust Krusi; director, Steven Schachter; writers, Martin Davidson , Schachter, William H. Macy; based on book “Deadly Pretender” by Karen Kingsbury; camera, William Wages; editor, Jim Oliver; sound, Joe Melody; music, Peter Manning Robinson; casting, Annette Benson (U.S.), Liz Mullane (N.Z.). Cast: Jeff Fahey, Kim Cattrall, DeLane Matthews, Walter Addison, Judith McConnell, Felcia Bell, Debra Eisenstadt, Paul Linke, Jay Saussey, Alexander Gander, Nicko Vella, John Sumner, Judi Douglass, John Parker, Grant Tilly, Bruce Allpress, Ross Duncan, Jon Brazier, Anthony Ray Parker, Mark Ferguson, Vicky Haughton, Sarah Boddy, Lisa Crittenden, Sterling Cathman, Amy Morrison, Brad Burnett, Callum Gallagher, Warren Carl. Narrator: Paul Linke. Seems like a simple, bordering on beguiling, story of a charming overachieving bigamist. The telefilm’s early segs,with bright, off-the-cuff dialog and fast action under Steven Schacter’s knowing direction, are light-hearted and merry as ambitious Mitch Parker (Jeff Fahey, who keenly defines the part) makes his way. When clouds loom, the artful study of a heel wearing down turns into dark trek down psychological lane. “Dream” has gone schizoid. Attracted to blond Candy (DeLane Matthews) in L.A., much-traveling, skirt-chasing Mitch marries her, explaining his considerable absences by saying he’s in the CIA. Meeting Liz (Kim Cattrall) on a plane, he asks her to marry him and they settle down. The con man becomes, then, a dedicated commuter, loved and admired by his wives. Liz believes he’s working for Disney, which is why they live in Florida and why he zips back to the West Coast so much. But he’s uncovered in California, so he tells Candy they have to sneak to Florida because they’re in spyish danger. She buys it, and both wives are unknowingly living in the same burg in Florida; the possibilities are as stupefying as a high-wire act. Yet it’s no “Captain’s Paradise” by a long shot. Writers Martin Davidson, Steven Schachter and William H. Macy restricted by basing the teleplay on a true story drag in murky elements, and Parker’s even more fearsome character emerges. Finances weigh Parker down, and his own fears of inadequacy kick in. His well’s bone dry, and, worse, his wives start wondering. Vidpic brings narrator Paul Linke onscreen for part of the later action and to explain what happens to Mitch. “Dreams,” once flying expertly above the clouds, changes gears and falls like a stone. Jeff Fahey of the recent “The Marshall” series displays considerable charm, good timing and appeal; even his later, dangerous moods are well played. Matthews’ Candy is a strong study of an innocent believer; Cattrall’s more sophisticated Liz is a convincing fall-girl. Jay Saussey, playing Candy’s cynical, suspicious 14-year-old daughter Samantha, is a find. William Wages’ camerawork is first rate, as is designer Alfred Sole’s resourceful use of Auckland’s location sites. Jim Oliver’s editing is superior, and Peter Manning Robinson’s witty score early on, as well as his somber entries for the big letdown, are inspired. Tony Scott

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