GOOD MORNING: The William Morris Agency’s newest client, Christopher Darden, told me he and Marcia Clark discussed the fact that he, too, was signing with WMA. “We think we both can accomplish our goals with the same agency,” Darden said from Norman Brokaw’s office. “I don’t think there is a conflict of interest.” Brokaw insisted there would be two separate agency teams for the prosecution team. Both Clark and Darden had been pitched by rival webs CBS and ABC to be lensed/interviewed while/after O.J. appears on NBC tonight. Included among those whose offices made requests of Clark and Darden were Diane Sawyer, Jane Pauley, Dan Rather, Mike Wallace. Does Darden have any feelings about O.J. being interrogated by Tom Brokaw and Katie Couric on NBC tonight? “Feelings, yes , strange feelings,” said the low-key Darden, “but no comment.” He did allow, “It’s a lot safer for him (O.J.) than being on the witness stand.” Would Darden go on TV? “I hope not — at least not at the present. Maybe at some point. I’d like to review what has happened. I have nothing to offer this week.” And Clark, through her adviser, attorney Mark Fleischer, said, “There’s no way I will make a comment on” O.J.’s NBC stint. Stay tuned. Darden reminded, “I want my piece of history preserved.” How? “In a book, I suppose — if someone wants me to write it.” He admitted he has a “bunch” of offers. As for why he came to Wm. Morris: “I have a unique perspective — as a black, African American. The issues loom larger in the country as a whole — racial issues, old wounds that have been opened.” What does he think of the role of cameras in court? “I’ve said all along that the camera does not belong.” What about his legal future? “This was my last case. I haven’t altered my view. But I want to put some time between it.” He continues to teach Concepts of Criminal Law classes at Cal State L.A. He taught there Tuesday night. “I love the kids,” he said. He mingled with some of the younger set at Planet Hollywood!

THE (COURT) BEAT GOES ON: From Frankfurt and the Book Fair, Dove’s Michael Viner revealed he’d signed Simpson jury foreperson Armanda Cooley and jurors Carrie Bess and Marsha Rubin to appear in his docu “Justice in America.” Deborah Raffin directs their scenes next Monday. The trio of jurors also will write (for Dove, natch) a book, “The Foreman” (tentative title). How does this book differ from others on the case? “It’s about the system, what is ‘reasonable doubt’ — their opinions of the defense team — and Judge Ito.” Viner claims, “Nine jurors came to us offering to be part of a book deal.” Other subjects that will be discussed in this book: Was there de facto jury tampering? Did loved ones bring information to the jurors during the trial? … On more sublime literary life: “Casino” author Nicholas Pileggi, who also wrote the screenplay with Martin Scorsese, tells me his book was a sellout in Las Vegas. Vegas had given the film troupe terrif cooperation on the story about murders, machinations of the mob in Vegas during the ’70s. “The Riviera hotel even let us shoot in their casino,” Pileggi reminded. “Marty didn’t want one built — he wanted the feeling of authenticity.” He says they even got a witness from the government protection program as technical adviser. “Only Marty, Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci and I knew who he really was. He used his expertise to show how Alan King’s character was murdered.” Further, De Niro went to Florida, spent time with Frank Rosenthal to ready for his role. “The cross-pollination with the real people helped the actors,” Pileggi admits. “But the movie is a movie, not a documentary.” Pileggi says this pic is “on a much higher level” of mobster than his “GoodFellas” with Scorsese. Next for the two? “Marty and I wrote ‘Neighborhood’ — about immigrants’ experiences. I’d like to see him do that.” But first Scorsese takes a musical break with “Gershwin,” written by John Guare.

“IS IT POSSIBLE WE’VE outlived our usefulness?” Leonard Nimoy admits he asked William Shatner on “Star Trek 6.””And that’s what gave me the inspiration to write this book,” he admits. The book, “I Am Spock,” is the result and Nimoy’s got some interesting conversations with — Spock! The thesp heads to Chicago Oct. 22 to receive a Doctorate of Humane Letters from Spertus Institute for Jewish Studies. “Now,” said Nimoy, “Mr. Spock becomes Dr. Spock!” Next for him is a return to legit directing — Trish Vradenburg’s “The Apple Doesn’t Fall,” a mother-and-daughter tale bowing here, hopefully heading for N.Y. Nimoy’s son, Adam, who directed him in an “Outer Limits,” next helms an “NYPD Blue”… Jeff Margolis, exec producing-directing the 11th TV Acad’s Hall of Fame Sunday at/for CBS, says, “I’d forgotten how emotional the inductees get. The opening montage of the past winners is very emotional.” The spec shows signs of being a regular on the web. John Ritter presents to his idol Dick Van Dyke, Peter Falk to his producers Richard Levinson (posthumously) and William Link, Larry King to Bill Moyers, Brett Butler to Betty White, Bruce Jenner to Jim McKay.

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