You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Act One ’95 Evening B

"Broken Bones" is a dark, realistic depiction of spousal abuse. What begins as a latenight spat between Steven (Willie Garson), a moody, frustrated computer programmer, and wife Jamie (Michelle Joyner), a sculptor, turns into a furious, violent attack that requires the intervention of neighbor Meg (Debra Jo Rupp).

“Broken Bones” is a dark, realistic depiction of spousal abuse. What begins as a latenight spat between Steven (Willie Garson), a moody, frustrated computer programmer, and wife Jamie (Michelle Joyner), a sculptor, turns into a furious, violent attack that requires the intervention of neighbor Meg (Debra Jo Rupp).

Writers Drew McWeeny and Scott Swan expertly chart the subtle escalation of rage as the couple veers toward destruction. Garson deftly captures the darkness of this sensitive man, while Joyner honestly portrays a woman trying desperately to understand when she should simply walk away. Play is directed with care and intensity by Don McManus.

“Leon and Joey” is an edgy, surreal comedy about twin brothers. Joey (Wayne Pere) hates everything about himself and his life and is bent on suicide. There’s only one hitch — he promised his dying mother that he would take care of Leon (Ben Meyerson), who’s retarded and spends most waking hours with an imaginary companion, Mo-Billy (Barry Sherman).

Joey decides that the solution is to find a woman for Leon in the personals, which produces Gina (Anne O’Sullivan), a stunningly optimistic survivor of multiple attacks and traumas. Playwright Keith Huff draws magical words from his characters and the result is a poetic, moody piece, well staged by director Paul McCrane.

Romance in all its guises is the subject of “Why the Beach Boys Are Like Opera,” set in the country house of Beth (Janet Zarish) and Charles (Michael Kaufman). When Beth’s college chums Karen (Anne DeSalvo) and Janet (Debra Stricklin) arrive for a weekend with Karen’s working-class boyfriend, Shane (Andy Lauer), and his buddy Harry (Don McManus), the romantic possibilities proliferate, especially when the hunk in the guest house, Alec (Richard Steinmetz) is added to the mix.

Writer Carole Real finds a properly light touch for this comedy, and Ken Frankel’s tender direction brings out sharply drawn details of each character.

While production values are minimal, the pieces are finely polished, with excellent perfs throughout. Producers Risa Bramon Garcia and Jerry Levine have chosen each play carefully, and worked hard to present a diversity of style and tone, both in writing and directing. Their efforts have paid off with another successful evening.

Act One '95 Evening B

(Met Theater; 99 seats; $ 19 top)

Production: A Showtime Networks Inc. presentation of four one-act plays. Sets, Richard Hoover, Denise Hudson; costumes, Taylor Kincaid Cheek; lighting, Rand Ryan; sound/original music, Ben Decter. Opened May 3, 1995; reviewed May 24; runs through June 17. Running time: 2 hours, 30 min. "Breast Men" Written by Bill Bozzone and Joe Di Pietro; directed by Josh Mostel. Cast: John C. McGinley (Lloyd), Steve Hofvendahl (Stuart), Robert Lessor (Gene). "Broken Bones" Written by Drew McWeeny and Scott Swan; directed by Don McManus. Cast: Willie Garson (Steven), Michelle Joyner (Jamie), Debra Jo Rupp (Meg). "Leon and Joey" Written by Keith Huff; directed by Paul McCrane. Cast: Wayne Pere (Joey), Ben Meyerson (Leon), Barry Sherman (Mo-Billy), Anne O'Sullivan (Gina). "Why the Beach Boys Are Like Opera" Written by Carole Real; directed by Ken Frankel. Cast: Anne DeSalvo (Karen), Debra Stricklin (Janet), Janet Zarish (Beth), Andy Lauer (Shane), Richard Steinmetz (Alec), Michael Kaufman (Charles), Don McManus (Harry). This outstanding festival of one-acts, featuring fine writing, acting and directing, continues with Evening B, which showcases an eclectic mix of writing styles. "Breast Men," by Bill Bozzone and Joe DiPietro, presents the unlikely pairing of two firefighters, who are longtime friends, in the Cupid Suite of a Catskills hotel. While Lloyd (John C. McGinley) is grieving over his recent separation from his wife, Stuart (Steve Hofvendahl) has a more unusual problem -- he has suddenly sprouted breasts. This threatens to change their relationship , and also arouses the attention of Gene (Robert Lessor), the hotel handyman. The gender-twisting fun, which in fact has serious undertones, is skillfully directed by Josh Mostel.

More Legit

  • Chess review

    D.C. Theater Review: 'Chess'

    “Broken Bones” is a dark, realistic depiction of spousal abuse. What begins as a latenight spat between Steven (Willie Garson), a moody, frustrated computer programmer, and wife Jamie (Michelle Joyner), a sculptor, turns into a furious, violent attack that requires the intervention of neighbor Meg (Debra Jo Rupp). Writers Drew McWeeny and Scott Swan expertly […]

  • Boys and Girls review Carey Mulligan

    London Theater Review: 'Boys and Girls' With Carey Mulligan

    “Broken Bones” is a dark, realistic depiction of spousal abuse. What begins as a latenight spat between Steven (Willie Garson), a moody, frustrated computer programmer, and wife Jamie (Michelle Joyner), a sculptor, turns into a furious, violent attack that requires the intervention of neighbor Meg (Debra Jo Rupp). Writers Drew McWeeny and Scott Swan expertly […]

  • Jeff Daniels

    Jeff Daniels to Star in Aaron Sorkin's 'To Kill a Mockingbird' on Broadway

    “Broken Bones” is a dark, realistic depiction of spousal abuse. What begins as a latenight spat between Steven (Willie Garson), a moody, frustrated computer programmer, and wife Jamie (Michelle Joyner), a sculptor, turns into a furious, violent attack that requires the intervention of neighbor Meg (Debra Jo Rupp). Writers Drew McWeeny and Scott Swan expertly […]

  • Kelli O'Hara

    Tony Winner Kelli O'Hara Signs With ICM

    “Broken Bones” is a dark, realistic depiction of spousal abuse. What begins as a latenight spat between Steven (Willie Garson), a moody, frustrated computer programmer, and wife Jamie (Michelle Joyner), a sculptor, turns into a furious, violent attack that requires the intervention of neighbor Meg (Debra Jo Rupp). Writers Drew McWeeny and Scott Swan expertly […]

  • Neil LaBute MCC Theater

    Neil LaBute Out as Playwright-in-Residence at Off Broadway's MCC Theater

    “Broken Bones” is a dark, realistic depiction of spousal abuse. What begins as a latenight spat between Steven (Willie Garson), a moody, frustrated computer programmer, and wife Jamie (Michelle Joyner), a sculptor, turns into a furious, violent attack that requires the intervention of neighbor Meg (Debra Jo Rupp). Writers Drew McWeeny and Scott Swan expertly […]

  • Katharine McPhee

    Katharine McPhee Joins Broadway's 'Waitress'

    “Broken Bones” is a dark, realistic depiction of spousal abuse. What begins as a latenight spat between Steven (Willie Garson), a moody, frustrated computer programmer, and wife Jamie (Michelle Joyner), a sculptor, turns into a furious, violent attack that requires the intervention of neighbor Meg (Debra Jo Rupp). Writers Drew McWeeny and Scott Swan expertly […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content