Fans hoping for a reunion tour of the Eagles will get their wish: Reps for the ’70s supergroup have hired the William Morris Agency to organize dates. A tour reunion album is also being planned, providing several legal issues sur-rounding members are resolved.

As reps for every booking agency in town circled, the gig was given to agent Peter Grosslight. Several promoters have already been contacted by the agency, with a handful of dates penciled in.

Lineup for the tour, aiming for a late-May start, is expected to be Don Henley, Glenn Frey, Don Felder, Joe Walsh and Timothy B. Schmidt. Original members Randy Meisner and Bernie Leadon are not expected to participate.

“We still got the magic,” said Walsh, who joined the group in 1976 and toured promoting the 1979 release “The Long Run,” its final outing before disbanding in 1982. “As soon as the non-art form issues are resolved, we’ll be out there,” he said, referring to legal entanglements.

Henley last year sued Geffen Records, seeking termination of his recording contract, and has told the label not to expect any future albums.

On Friday, MCA sued Frey, seeking $ 5 million in damages, saying the singer owes them several more albums.

In a letter to MCA last month, Frey said he would no longer record for the label and sought to have his recording contract terminated. In its suit, MCA asked the court to bar Frey from recording for anyone else.

Sources said the tour isn’t likely to be held up by the legal wranglings, but plans for a live reunion-tour album may have difficulty getting off the ground.

From 1972 to the early ’80s, the Eagles were one of the top rock bands of the era advancing the countrified-rock genre. Its signature sound on “Best of My Love,””Hotel California” and “One of These Nights” helped the band score a slew of chart-topping singles and multiplatinum albums.

Former Eagles manager Irving Azoff, now owner of Giant Records, is spearheading the tour and album effort. He also manages Henley.

Azoff has been characteristically tightlipped, but a source involved in planning said the tour is “gonna go. While it may get complicated trying to get the clearances for Henley and Frey to participate in an album, the tour is something everyone wants to happen — even outsiders of the Azoff camp.”

The popularity of the Eagles is seemingly at an all-time high, thanks to “Common Thread: The Songs of the Eagles.” The album has sold over 3 million copies.

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