Review: ‘Nothing Personal’

An uncompromising depiction of the cult of sectarian violence that has in the past created civil war in Northern Ireland, Nothing Personal is a totally riveting drama rigorously directed by Thaddeus O'Sullivan.

An uncompromising depiction of the cult of sectarian violence that has in the past created civil war in Northern Ireland, Nothing Personal is a totally riveting drama rigorously directed by Thaddeus O’Sullivan.

Action is set in Belfast 20 years ago, when both sides were trying to forge a truce as a way out of the escalating bloodshed. O’Sullivan and screenwriter Daniel Mornin, working from his book All Our Fault, carefully depict the different levels of command within a Loyalist (i.e., pro-British) paramilitary group, from their bluff leader (Michael Gambon) down to members of a trigger-happy gang who bring unrelenting violence to the city streets.

This particular unit is nominally led by Kenny (James Frain), who sees himself as a soldier in the anti-IRA struggle, but the unit is effectively run by the hotheaded Ginger (Ian Hart), a fanatical bigot for whom the only good Catholic is a dead one. The fanatical Protestants are contrasted with a Catholic, Liam Kelly (John Lynch), who isn’t an IRA member and deplores the violence, trying only to make a life for himself and his two children.

This is a far superior film to O’Sullivan’s previous December Bride. The fine cast give flawless performances. Filmed on location in Dublin, pic has a totally authentic feel.

Nothing Personal

UK

Production

Little Bird/Channel 4. Director Thaddeus O'Sullivan; Producer Jonathan Cavendish, Tracey Seaward; Screenplay Daniel Mornin; Camera Dick Pope; Editor Michael Parker; Music Philip Appleby; Art Director Mark Geraghty

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1995. Running time: 86 MIN.

With

Ian Hart John Lynch James Frain Michael Gambon Gary Lydon Ruaidhri Conroy
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading