Local and national coverage of the L.A. riots and events leading to them were recognized yesterday by the Peabody Awards, which also noted achievements by network series “Seinfeld,””Roseanne” and “Northern Exposure.”

The prestigious awards, for outstanding broadcast and cable programming in 1992, were announced by the University of Georgia’s Henry W. Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communications, which administers them.

NBC and Castle Rock Entertainment were recognized for “Seinfeld,””a program which proves that a show ostensibly about nothing can indeed be about something.”

ABC and the Carsey-Werner Co. were singled out for “Roseanne,””simultaneously a situation comedy and a deft illustration of the status of the contemporary American family.”

CBS and Finnegan-Pinchuk Co., in association with Brand-Falsey Prods., were noted for “Northern Exposure: Cicely,””an episode of this previously recognized series which raises the program to an even higher standard.”

HBO and Springcreek Prods., in association with Breakheart Films, were cited for “Citizen Cohn,””perhaps the best film produced for any medium in 1992.”

Election-related awards went to Propaganda Films and Fox Broadcasting Co. for “Rock the Vote” and MTV Music Television for “Choose or Lose.”

Awards went to KTTV, Los Angeles, for its coverage of the trial of the officers accused in the videotaped beating of Rodney King and to L.A.’s KJLH radio for coverage of the riots that followed their acquittal on state charges.

KTTV was praised for its gavel-to-gavel coverage of the first King trial, which “provided a direct line to the community of the deliberations and implications of the trial.”

KJLH was credited with “timely, exhaustive and important coverage of the Los Angeles riots.”

Also noted for riot coverage was ABC News’ “Nightline” for its “Moments of Crisis — Anatomy of a Riot,””a synthesis of the causes, actions and effects of the Los Angeles riots of 1992.”

WGBH-TV, Boston, won four Peabodys, two of them shared, for news programs and the geography quiz show “Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?”

ABC News’ “Nightline” and HBO each won two awards.

Personal awards go to journalist Daniel Schorr and PBS personality Fred Rogers, and institutional nods to BBC Radio and C-SPAN.

Awards, named for philanthropist George Foster Peabody, will be presented May 17 in New York.

Other winners follow.

NBC for “The More You Know.”

CNN, Atlanta, for “Larry King Live Election Coverage 1992.”

ABC News’ “Nightline” for “72 Hours to Victory.”

CBS and Granada Television, London, for “Age Seven in America.”

WTVJ-TV in Miami for its coverage of Hurricane Andrew.

NPR and correspondent Sylvia Poggioli for “Prisoners in Bosnia”; NPR and WBUR , Boston, for “Car Talk.”

KFFA radio in Helena, Ark., for “King Biscuit Time.”

American Folklife Radio Project and David Isay, independent producer, for a body of work.

WTVJ, Miami, for its coverage of Hurricane Andrew.

KIRO-TV in Seattle for “When the Salmon Runs Dry.”

WGBH, Boston, for “The American Experience: The Donner Party” and for “The Health Quarterly: The AIDS Report Series”; WGBH and BBC for “The Machine That Changed the World.”

HBO and Maysles Films Inc., New York, for “Abortion: Desperate Choices.”

KNME-TV and the Institute for American Indian Arts in Albuquerque, N.M., for “Surviving Columbus.”

Signifyin’ Works of Berkeley and PBS for “Color Adjustment.”

Canamedia Prods. Ltd. and TV Ontario, Toronto, for “Threads of Hope.”

HKO Media Inc. and WKBD-TV in Detroit for “Close to Home: The Tommy Boccomino Story.”

GPN-Nebraska ETV Network, Lincoln, Neb., for “Reading Rainbow: The Wall.”

WCVB-TV in Needham, Mass., for “The Incredible Voyage of Bill Pinkney.”

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