ALL BURNING questions regarding Porno for Pyros and lead singer Perry Farrell’s post-Jane’s Addiction compulsions will at long last be answered when the incendiary band makes its recorded bow Tuesday.

The answers would have come a few weeks sooner had the band’s self-titled Warner Bros. debut disc — featuring unmistakable vocalist Farrell, guitarist Peter DiStefano, former Thelonious Monster bassist Martyn Le Noble and drummer Stephen Perkins — not had such inflamatory album artwork.

Farrell’s previous art flap centered on the anatomically correct Jane’s Addiction cover for “Ritual De Lo Habitual” and an ensuing censorship vs. First Amendment dialogue. This time, the new “Porno for Pyros” cover art caused a postponed release until its creator, Farrell, removed a swastika — Farrell insists it’s a “yantra” from the center of a Star of David.

Porno for Pyros proffers an unblinking view of the current state of Los Angeles. Among its topics: violence (“Packin’ .25″) and racial tension (“Black Girlfriend”). The boldest lyrical link to the city’s troubles comes in the band’s theme song: “Came home last night/There was fire and smoke on the TV/Cops and the Army/People running out in the street looting …”

The album’s exotic swagger was premiered with a teaser radio release of “Cursed Female” and “Cursed Male,” a set of sardonic album tracks presenting inverted observations on each gender’s biggest drawbacks. The album’s upcoming single (and its most accessible track) is “Pets,” melodic and soothing with an amusing innocence that has inspired the band’s publicists to propose that Porno for Pyros perform on “Sesame Street.”

Farrell’s familiar voice and eccentric frankness continues to be his band’s strongest calling card, especially since the Pyros (to their credit) don’t particularly go out of their way to counteract inevitable comparisons to Jane’s Addiction.

Confident and skillful, Porno for Pyros has no need for nostalgia. “I have a new suit now, and it feels great,” Farrell said. “Why should I miss something that seems like old laundry?”

Porno for Pyros will hit the concert trail in late May for a U.S. tour preceding a handful of unannounced appearances at this year’s Lollapalooza Tour.

ALTHOUGH MOST famous for Live Aid and Band Aid, a history most would wear with pride, Sir Bob Geldof prefers to put his past away and have his music heard objectively.

“People are always interested in all the other stuff, which only occupies about 2% of my brain space,” says Geldof. “They’ve read my book, seen ‘The Wall, ‘ ” watched Live Aid, bought ‘U.S.A. for Africa,’ played Band Aid and have a couple of the Boomtown Rats songs, whatever. Yet music is 98% of my life.”

Hoping to thrust his music into the public spotlight again, Geldof’s first Polydor album, “The Happy Club,” arrived in stores April 20. A collection of poetic, clever songs that explore a range of human emotions, it still carries the same burdens that caused Geldof to depart Atlantic Records to join Polydor on a worldwide basis.

“Atlantic, though nice people, are a microcosm of America’s problem in a macro sense,” he says. “They just don’t know what to do with me. I don’t understand why (radio stations) don’t play me in America. It’s not a million miles from what other bands do. Is there an embargo on me or something?”

Geldof feels his charity endeavors, although creating fame, have actually impeded his musical career. “I get the charity (expletive),” he says. “They say, ‘Oh, the Live Aid guy. I guess we owe him one since he saved the entire planet. Let’s play him at 3:30 a.m.’ And I couldn’t possibly deliver on expectations. If I would have brought out ‘Sgt. Pepper,’ they would have said, ‘It wasn’t what we expected.’ “

Having switched managers (to Geoff Jukes) as well as labels, Geldof begins a U.S. tour April 22 through mid-June in support of the album, followed by the release of a greatest hits album, a career documentary video and a live concert film to be shot in Australia during the current tour.

L.A. SEEN: A&M threw a party at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel’s Cinegrill for Aaron Neville’s second A&M solo release, “The Grand Tour.” Accompanied by two pianos and acoustic guitar, Neville pulled the show off despite sound problems, gamely sticking a finger in his left ear as he set the place on fire. His effortless tenor floated, shook and wailed in a show that began with “These Foolish Things” and ended with a gospel, harmonized version of the “Mickey Mouse Club Theme” that brought the house down. Highlight of the set was his cover of Leonard Cohen’s “Song of Bernadette,” beautiful enough to induce tears, which it almost did to everyone but Cohen himself, who was standing and grinning at the bar.

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