by Janice Fouks Blum, Sam Green, Robert L. Garland, Clive Rosengren, Stuart Oken

THE PHONE CALLS came a few hours apart. “Hey, wasn’t that your Marty Klein?” (Daily Variety, Oct. 26), three people called to ask me. The reason for the phone calls was that he was someone in the business who had extended kindness to me and I had shared it with great enthusiasm with my close friends.

I was vacationing on the East Coast, had met a talented musician who had suggested I might call Marty Klein at APA. “He’s a menschy guy. He might help you.” Being one more writer/producer looking for that proverbial “break,” I figured, what do I have to lose?

I dialed and left a message. Much to my shock and surprise, he called me back. Himself. On my machine. When we finally connected, we had a lot of laughs. It was one of those kinetic conversations. He kept accusing me of stealing his lines. But, after about 15-20 minutes, he told me to put what we had discussed in writing and he’d share it with someone at the agency. I thanked him by baking him cookies. It’s something I do when someone’s extra nice. He was extra nice.

Well, I immediately shared the incident with friends. Kindness is like a snowstorm in Los Angeles. You never forget it when it happens. It’s that rare. Almost an oddity. So, when I picked up Monday’s trades, I felt an enormous sadness and a sense of loss. A sadness for a man I never met. A man who didn’t know me.

So, to my friends who called me–Yes, it was “my” Marty Klein. I never met the man. But, I sure will always remember him. Now maybe, so will you.

Janice Fouks Blum
Los Angeles

Brooks not the first

I BELIEVE THERE WAS AN INACCURACY in Adam Sandler’s article on Garth Brooks (Daily Variety, Oct. 5).

Garth Brooks was not the first artist in history to have two albums debut as No. 1. According to “The Billboard Book of Top 40 Albums,” Elton John accomplished this in 1975 with “Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy” (the first album ever to debut at No. 1) and “Rock of the Westies.”

Once again, as someone in the industry who relies on your paper, it is reassuring to see your commitment to accuracy in action.

Sam Green
Largo Entertainment
Los Angeles

Anniversary’s an issue

WE ARE DISAPPOINTED in your 59th Anniversary issue.

The abbreviated film reviews are an insult to your readers. We know the economy is poor and ads are down, but if you are going to do the special issue, do it right.

We look forward to a proper 60th Anniversary issue in 1993, even at a higher price.

Robert L. Garland
North Hollywood

Column a sob story

CLAUDIA ELLER’S COLUMN (Daily Variety, Oct. 20) has the makings of a cracker-jack espionage thriller. Typewriters and word processors all over the hallowed halls of Hollywood must be feverishly clicking away with tales of midnight assignations, clandestine meetings, anonymous phone calls, and spine-tingling plot twists involving … agents?!

Ah, but my incredulity and sense of outrage were only heightened when I learned with horror that “sad cries and profound solemnity can be heard from the hoards of folks who’ve lost their jobs in the shuffle.” My tears of anguish dripped all over my SAG, AFTRA and Equity cards when I learned that “the body count” of the displaced and homeless, the poor and disenfranchised thrown out into the cold, cruel world reached “staggering proportions,” perhaps “as many as 150.”

I flirted with the thought of standing at an off-ramp with a tin cup to help defray the cost of “psychiatric counselors” that had to be called in to help these poor, unfortunate wretches fill out an unemployment claim. I even thought of scurrying out into the dead of night to see if I could find an actor or a member of IATSE who could spare some free time to explain to them what a “waiting week” is and to brace them for the fact that they won’t have a wet bar when they go file for benefits.

But I am heartened to learn that these waifs raised their spirits by pooling their severance checks to pay for an unemployment party. I wasn’t invited, but then I’ve been to so many I’ve lost my taste for caviar. My eyes will be tearing up in admiration as I watch the hoards of casualties climb into their BMWs, their Mercedes Benzes and their Lexuses and drive proudly and with heads held high to the Beverly Hills unemployment office. I dare say they’ll find no trouble parking. Are the parking valets out there still working?

Clive Rosengren
Tujunga

Citing more writers

WHILE WE APPRECIATE THE COVERAGE and the accurate presentation of our projects in the article announcing Witt-Thomas Films’ current production slate (Daily Variety, Nov. 19), the story omitted several writers we would like to acknowledge.

Currently at work on our projects: Ebbe Roe Smith (“Falling Down”), Peter Iliff (“Patriot Games”), Mark Andrus (“Old Friends”), Mark Allen Smith (“Dateline: Salonika”), Chris Cleveland (“The Passion of Richard Nixon”), Robert Dillon (“The River”) and Anna Theresa Cascio. These writers, along with the ones who were included, provide a vision that can successfully propel us into the future.

Stuart Oken
President, Witt-Thomas Films
Los Angeles

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