Review: ‘Mi Vida Loca’

A portrait of young Latino women in the Los Angeles barrios, Allison Anders' Mi Vida Loca is a particularly disappointing follow-up to Gas, Food Lodging. Dramatically fuzzy and very flat visually and in performance, this slice-of-life look at the gang culture is scarcely a satisfying treatment.

A portrait of young Latino women in the Los Angeles barrios, Allison Anders’ Mi Vida Loca is a particularly disappointing follow-up to Gas, Food Lodging. Dramatically fuzzy and very flat visually and in performance, this slice-of-life look at the gang culture is scarcely a satisfying treatment.

The drama focuses on two gang girls, Sad Girl (Angel Aviles) and Mousie (Seidy Lopez), lifelong friends who nearly come to blows after discovering they have been sharing the same man. The three-part tale then follows the lives of these women and several of their friends as they have babies, pursue relationships with invariably unreliable men, strike attitudes and try to figure out what to do with their lives.

The only woman with any real illumination about a positive life course is Giggles (Marlo Marron), who on release from prison announces she is going to go into computers, a remark met with derisive incomprehension.

Most of the dialogue, when it prevails over the voiceover, consists of banal everyday conversation or attitudinizing, and Anders’ staging of scenes is listless and unimaginative. The actresses’ range seems limited at best.

Mi Vida Loca

Production

Cineville/HBO/Odyssey. Director Allison Anders; Producer Daniel Hassid, Carl-Jan Colpaert; Screenplay Allison Anders; Camera Rodrigo Garcia; Editor Richard Chew, Kathryn Himoff, Tracy Granger; Music John Taylor; Art Director Jane Stewart

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1993. Running time: 95 MIN.

With

Angel Aviles Seidy Lopez Jacob Vargas Marlo Marron Nelida Lopez Jessie Borrego
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading