Mayor David Dinkins is expected to end a seven-month search today by appointing Richard Brick as the new commissioner of the Office of Film, Theater & Broadcasting, sources said.

Brick, a 47-year-old veteran New York-based producer, adjunct professor and former chairman of the Columbia U. Film School, will replace Jaynne Keyes, who left in May to become a William Morris agent.

The film office had been run by Keyes’ former deputy, acting commissioner Nina Streich, who’s leaving on Friday to produce documentaries. Neither Brick nor a Dinkins spokeswoman would comment.

Brick’s producer credits include the Joe Vasquez feature “Hangin’ With the Homeboys” and Emir Kusturica’s “Arizona Dreams.”

The appointment ends a turbulent and highly political process to replace Keyes. In April, the week Keyes gave notice, an advisory committee made up of industry leaders started a search. After sifting through 45 resumes, they delivered the names of four finalists.

But when other industry leaders protested the choices, newly named deputy mayor Barry Sullivan threw out the results of the search and asked headhunting film Russell Reynolds Associates to undertake a new one.

The firm, working pro bono, culled through more than 800 resumes before narrowing its list to the finalists. Brick emerged as top choice for the job, which pays $ 78,000 per year.

Paired with a pending breakthrough in talks between the studios and Teamsters Local 817, the naming of a film commissioner is viewed by many as a positivedevelopment for the location film biz.

New York has yet to attract the level of studio biz it enjoyed before a bitter labor dispute with IATSE technical unions, lasting from November 1990 to May ’91, prompted the majors to relocate work.

Two of the few studio films to shoot here–”Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” and “Malcolm X”–both opened to impressive weekend grosses. One of Brick’s main priorities will be to convince the studios to film in the city more often.

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