Ian Copeland’s Frontier Booking Intl. and InterTalent Agency have parted ways over a clash in business styles after being in business for just seven months.

Copeland put out a terse statement Friday that he has left the agency and has reformed the music division of his 14-year-old FBI in Hollywood.

FBI Film & Television, which was not part of the association with ITA, remains housed in New York.

Beyond his statement, Copeland said only: “Obviously, it just didn’t work out. It was a good concept, good idea, but I found that the music business and the film business didn’t really understand each other.”

An ITA official said it would be “inappropriate to comment” now.

While neither Copeland nor the ITA partners would discuss the split, knowledgeable sources said Copeland’s casual style of doing business conflicted with the agency’s more button-down approach.

Speculation was widespread Friday that ITA may take legal action against Copeland and FBI.

It is unclear whether Copeland too is considering litigation.

When Copeland brought FBI’s music division into ITA in February, it was with the understanding that he would be made a partner in the agency, but that reportedly never came to fruition.

It also is undecided at this point on whose roster the 57 bands that FBI brought to ITA–including such cutting-edge rock ‘n’ roll artists as Sting, Oingo Boingo, Squeeze and Morrissey–will wind up.

While ITA partner David Schiff continues to represent Sting in movies and TV, the artist’s longtime association with Ian and his brother Miles Copeland–who has been Sting’s manager since the singer was in the Police–also is expected to stay intact.

At this point, it’s not clear what ITA’s commitment to music biz is. The agency had hoped the association with FBI would expand its talent base and business opportunites.

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