Venice/Venice represents the definition of a vanity production. Sliding way over the line between personal cinema and egotism, Henry Jaglom's ninth feature lacks either the colorful characters or innately interesting subject matter of his better films, telling essentially a non-story in slight, schematic fashion.

Venice/Venice represents the definition of a vanity production. Sliding way over the line between personal cinema and egotism, Henry Jaglom’s ninth feature lacks either the colorful characters or innately interesting subject matter of his better films, telling essentially a non-story in slight, schematic fashion.

Portraying the director of the only American film in competition at the Venice Film Festival, Jaglom announces at the outset that he is a maverick: ‘I am the representative of the anti-establishment.’

Jaglom builds a fragile little story about his curious relationship with attractive French journalist Nelly Alard, who is obsessed with his work. Jaglom gives her a sort-of interview that allows him to expound upon his own talents, pursue her a bit at lunch and around the pool and finally make out with her during a scenic gondola ride.

After an hour, setting shifts to Venice, Calif., as Alard wanders in on a party Jaglom is throwing. Nothing much happens here except for some auditions in which Jaglom is looking for a woman to play his wife in an upcoming film, Happy Endings.

Seemingly given their heads in the dialogue department, thesps seem at a loss where to take the scenes.

Venice/Venice

Production

International Rainbow. Director Henry Jaglom; Producer Judith Wolinsky; Screenplay Henry Jaglom; Camera Hanania Baer; Editor Henry Jaglom

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1992. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

Nelly Alard Henry Jaglom Melissa Leo Suzanne Bertish Daphna Kastner David Duchovny
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