Review: ‘Under Siege’

Warners has the right stuff with Under Siege, an immensely slick, if also old-fashioned and formulaic, entertainment. Steven Seagal fans and action buffs should eat this up.

Warners has the right stuff with Under Siege, an immensely slick, if also old-fashioned and formulaic, entertainment. Steven Seagal fans and action buffs should eat this up.

Seagal plays a cook on the USS Missouri, the Navy’s largest and most powerful battleship. En route to decommission, a quiet, calm journey turns out to be volatile and dangerous when two corrupt psychopaths, both top military experts, hijack the ship and steal its nuclear arsenal.

Seagal’s rebellious cook is actually a decorated Navy Seal. He is contrasted with the lethal and hot-tempered William Strannix (Tommy Lee Jones), a former covert CIA operative, and Commander Krill (Gary Busey), a frustrated officer. Motivated by revenge, both men feel they have good reasons to execute their diabolical plot.

An attractive actress (Playboy and Baywatch alum Erika Eleniak), hired to perform at a farewell party, is thrown into the all-male adventure, and later functions as Seagal’s resourceful mate and quasi-romantic interest.

In between battles, blasts and explosions, scripter J.F. Lawton (Pretty Woman) has shrewdly placed the funny one-liners, delivered by Seagal in his customary cool, tongue-in-cheek style.

1992: Nomination: Best Sound, Sound Effects Editing

Under Siege

Production

Warner. Director Andrew Davis; Producer Arnon Milchan, Steven Seagal, Steven Reuther; Screenplay J.F. Lawton; Camera Frank Tidy; Editor Robert A. Ferretti, Denis Virkler, Don Brochu, Dov Hoenig; Music Gary Chang; Art Director Bill Kenney

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1992. Running time: 102 MIN.

With

Steven Seagal Tommy Lee Jones Gary Busey Erika Eleniak Patrick O'Neal Nick Mancuso
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