Blending elements of Rocky and The Sting, this crowd-teaser mixes it up with boxing, revenge and salty one-liners that should satisfy audiences.

Blending elements of Rocky and The Sting, this crowd-teaser mixes it up with boxing, revenge and salty one-liners that should satisfy audiences.

James Woods demonstrates his trademark intensity along with a comic flair as a just-paroled hustler who sets up a big-money boxing match pitting his ringer ‘Honey’ Roy Palmer (Louis Gossett Jr) against any 10 men from the burg of Diggstown.

Like The Sting, the target is truly despicable, and few can fit that description more capably than Bruce Dern, whose character stole the town from its citizens and rubs out anyone who crosses him.

All the trademark flourishes are there, including a couple of murders for motivation, a beautiful woman (Heather Graham) of little narrative consequence, a tenuous relationship between Dern and his son (a suddenly quite grown-up Thomas Wilson Brown), and Woods’ and Gossett’s scam-gone-wrong history, leading to ample good-natured bickering.

The boxing sequences are compelling, and Gossett convincingly comes across as an aging brawler with a potent right cross.

Diggstown

Production

M-G-M/Eclectic. Director Michael Ritchie; Producer Robert Schaffel; Screenplay Steven McKay; Camera Gerry Fisher; Editor Don Zimmerman; Music James Newton Howard; Art Director Steve Hendrickson

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1992. Running time: 97 MIN.

With

James Woods Louis Gossett Jr Bruce Dern Oliver Platt Heather Graham Randall 'Tex' Cobb
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