Nifty performances make this routine action flick better than it probably has a right to be. Playing to the Rambo mentality by focusing on an elite naval-attack group kicking tail around the globe, the film won't be a favorite of peaceniks or any Arab anti-defamation leagues.

Nifty performances make this routine action flick better than it probably has a right to be. Playing to the Rambo mentality by focusing on an elite naval-attack group kicking tail around the globe, the film won’t be a favorite of peaceniks or any Arab anti-defamation leagues.

The film begins with a full-blown assignment and repeatedly sends the group out on elaborate suicide missions, showcasing plenty of gee-whiz gimickry in the process.

That first mission involves freeing US personnel from terrorists who, it turns out, have access to hand-held stinger missiles. The Navy Seals must subsequently locate the missiles and then eliminate them, aided (preposterously) by a beautiful TV reporter (Joanne Whalley-Kilmer).

Michael Biehn displays plenty of quiet determination, while Charlie Sheen cuts loose as a borderline psycho whose maverick style and cat-and-mouse games with death occasionally endager fellow team members.

Director Lewis Teague brings real flair to much of the action, though the messy, overlong finale – set, no less, in the ravaged streets of Beirut – gets way out of hand.

Navy Seals

Production

Orion. Director Lewis Teague; Producer Brenda Feigen, Bernard Williams; Screenplay Chuck Pfarrer, Gary Goldman; Camera John A. Alonzo; Editor Don Zimmerman; Music Sylvester LeVay; Art Director Guy J. Comtois, Veronica Hadfield

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1990. Running time: 113 MIN.

With

Charlie Sheen Michael Biehn Joanne Whalley-Kilmer Rick Rossovich Cyril O'Reilly Bill Paxton
Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more
Post A Comment 0