This vulgar sequel to 1989's longest-running sleeper hit looks like a rush job. Joined by her husband Neal Israel (who also appears as star Kirstie Alley's mean boss) in the scripting, filmmaker Amy Heckerling overemphasizes toilet humor and expletives to make the film appealing mainly to adolescents rather than an across-the-board family audience.

This vulgar sequel to 1989’s longest-running sleeper hit looks like a rush job. Joined by her husband Neal Israel (who also appears as star Kirstie Alley’s mean boss) in the scripting, filmmaker Amy Heckerling overemphasizes toilet humor and expletives to make the film appealing mainly to adolescents rather than an across-the-board family audience.

Unwed mom Alley and cabbie John Travolta are married for the sequel, with her cute son Mikey metamorphosed into Lorne Sussman, still voiceovered as precocious by Bruce Willis. First mutual arrival is undeniably cute Megan Milner, unfortunately voiced-over by Roseanne Barr. Comedienne gets a couple of laughs but is generally dull, leaving Willis to again carry the load in the gag department with well-read quips.

Plotline revolves around the bickering of Alley and Travolta whose jobs (accountant and would-be airline pilot) and personalities clash, as well as the rites of passage of the two kids. New characters, notably Alley’s obnoxious brother Elias Koteas, are added to ill effect. Mel Brooks is enlisted to voice-over Mr Toilet Man, a fantasy bathroom bowl come to life, spitting blue water and anxious to bite off Mikey’s privates.

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Production

Tri-Star. Director Amy Heckerling; Producer Jonathan D. Krane; Screenplay Amy Heckerling, Neal Israel; Camera Thoms Del Ruth; Editor Debra Chiate; Music David Kitay, Maureen Crowe; Art Director Reuben Freed

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1990. Running time: 81 MIN.

With

John Travolta Kirstie Alley Olympia Dukakis Elias Koteas Twink Caplan Neal Israel
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