Theresa Russell gives a solid performance in Sondre Locke's well-directed film noir [from a screen story by John De Marco]. Russell is a beautiful undercover cop whose life is going nowhere, hence the title: she would like to break out of her rut and act on impulse like one of the prostitute or druggie personas she routinely adopts in her work.

Theresa Russell gives a solid performance in Sondre Locke’s well-directed film noir [from a screen story by John De Marco]. Russell is a beautiful undercover cop whose life is going nowhere, hence the title: she would like to break out of her rut and act on impulse like one of the prostitute or druggie personas she routinely adopts in her work.

Along with her sexist boss George Dzundza, she’s assigned to work with young assistant d.a. Jeff Fahey to find missing witness Shawn Elliott in an important gangster case. Elliott has $900,000 stolen in a Colombian drug deal, and there’s only three weeks to find him before Fahey begins the trial.

Russell and Fahey have some interesting exchanges that expose their characters. Sharpest writing comes in a scene of Fahey and his partner Alan Rosenberg talking about women and relationships in terms from real estate.

Director Locke, in her second feature after Ratboy, gets high marks for the visceral, swift nature of her violent stagings. She also manages an impressively tactile sex scene that involves Russell and Fahey.

Impulse

Production

Warner. Director Sondra Locke; Producer Albert S. Ruddy, Andre Morgan; Screenplay John De Marco, Leigh Chapman; Camera Dean Semler; Editor John W. Wheeler; Music Michel Colombier; Art Director William A. Elliott

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1990. Running time: 108 MIN.

With

Theresa Russell Jeff Fahey George Dzundza Alan Rosenberg Shawn Elliott Nicholas Mele
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