Fatherland is a major film from Ken Loach. He has created an ambiguous yet penetrating work about two opposing cultures and the way they both manipulate and control artistic expression, and about the response of two generations to those cultures.

Fatherland is a major film from Ken Loach. He has created an ambiguous yet penetrating work about two opposing cultures and the way they both manipulate and control artistic expression, and about the response of two generations to those cultures.

Focus of the drama is Klaus Dritteman, a dissident folk singer first silenced by the East Germans, then allowed to leave quietly. He is greeted in West Berlin with lavish treatment all round, but he is unhappy being treated as a commodity in the West and doesn’t know if he can be creative in his new environment.

As usual with Loach, performers are not encouraged to ‘act’ in the expected emotive way, and everyone, notably singer Gerulf Pannach, who plays Klaus, is quietly thoughtful and low-key.

Fatherland

UK - W. Germany

Production

Film Four/MK2/Clasart/Kestrel I. Director Ken Loach; Producer Raymond Day; Screenplay Trevor Griffiths; Camera Chris Menges; Editor Jonathan Morris; Music Christian Kunert, Gerulf Pannach; Art Director Martin Johnson

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1986. Running time: 110 MIN.

With

Gerulf Pannach Fabienne Babe Sigfrit Steiner Cristine Rose
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