Review: ‘The Hunger’

Like so many other films from British commercials directors, The Hunger [from the novel by Whitley Strieber] is all visual and aural flash, although this modern vampire story looks so great, as do its three principal performers, and is so bizarre that it possesses a certain perverse appeal.

Like so many other films from British commercials directors, The Hunger [from the novel by Whitley Strieber] is all visual and aural flash, although this modern vampire story looks so great, as do its three principal performers, and is so bizarre that it possesses a certain perverse appeal.

Opening sequence provides viewers with a pretty good idea of what’s in store. Catherine Deneuve and David Bowie pick up a couple of punky rock ‘n’ rollers. Deneuve and Bowie commit a double murder in their elegantly appointed New York apartment, and the prevailing motif of sex mixed with bloody death is established.

Although Deneuve and Bowie privately vow to stay with one another forever, Bowie soon notices himself growing rapidly older and visits author-doctor Susan Sarandon, who is preoccupied with the problem of accelerated aging. Shunned by her, Bowie deteriorates quickly and Deneuve buries him in a box in her attic next to her previous lovers.

Distraught over her mistreatment of Bowie, Sarandon begins visiting Deneuve, and a provative highlight is their seduction and lovemaking scene.

In his feature debut, director Tony Scott, brother of Ridley, exhibits the same penchant for eleborate art direction, minimal, humorless dialog and shooting in smoky rooms.

The Hunger

Production

M-G-M/United Artists. Dir Tony Scott; Producer Richard A. Shepherd; Screenplay Ivan Davis, Michael Thomas; Camera Stephen Goldblatt; Editor Pamela Power; Music Michel Rubini, Denny Jaeger Art Dir Brian Morris

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1983. Running time: 97 MIN.

With

Catherine Deneuve David Bowie Susan Sarandon Cliff De Young Beth Ehlers Dan Hedaya
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