An engaging idea - Dudley Moore as a successful, married shrink who becomes obsessed with a beautiful patient (Elizabeth McGovern) - is rendered inoperable by Marshall Brickman's witless script and uninspired direction.

An engaging idea – Dudley Moore as a successful, married shrink who becomes obsessed with a beautiful patient (Elizabeth McGovern) – is rendered inoperable by Marshall Brickman’s witless script and uninspired direction.

Perhaps most descriptive of the script’s desperation is the gimmicky inclusion of Sigmund Freud, who mystically materializes in the person of Alec Guinness whenever Moore seeks professional help. Guinness properly plays it straight and slightly aloof, telling Moore that his obsession with McGovern ‘reminds us what we really are – animals – take it or leave it.’ Pure Freud.

Ron Silver is fine as an arrogant actor but Gene Sacks as a suicidal patient, John Huston and Alan King as stuffy doctors, and Renee Taylor, as a patient, are all embarrassing.

Lovesick

Production

Ladd/Warner. Director Marshall Brickman; Producer Charles Okun; Screenplay Marshall Brickman; Camera Gerry Fisher; Editor Nina Feinberg; Music Philippe Sarde; Art Director Philip Rosenberg

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1983. Running time: 95 MIN.

With

Dudley Moore Elizabeth McGovern Alec Guinness John Huston William Shawn Alan King

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