Review: ‘Lianna’

John Sayles again uses a keen intelligence and finely tuned ear to tackle the nature of friendship and loving in Lianna.

John Sayles again uses a keen intelligence and finely tuned ear to tackle the nature of friendship and loving in Lianna.

Story of a 33-year-old woman (Linda Griffiths), saddled with an arrogant and unsupportive professor-husband (John DeVries) who constricts her life until she finds herself falling in love, for the first time, with a woman teacher (Jane Hallaren).

Particularly well-drawn are her husband’s doubly-hurt sense of sexual betrayal, the half-formed understandings of her children, who’ve only just become aware of conventional sexual realities, and the ambivalence of once-close women friends.

Paced by Griffiths’ excellent pivotal performance, the film is marked by fine acting overall, particularly Hallaren as the catalytic lover scared off by the intensity of Griffiths’ feelings; DeVries as the acerbic, insecure academic mate; Jo Henderson as the retroactively frightened best girlfriend; and Jesse Solomon as the wise-beyond-years pubescent son. Sayles himself appears to good effect as a supportive friend.

Lianna

Production

Winwood. Director John Sayles; Producer Jeffrey Nelson; Screenplay John Sayles; Camera Austin de Besche; Editor John Sayles; Music Mason Daring; Art Director Jeanne McDonnell

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1983. Running time: 110 MIN.

With

Linda Griffiths Jane Hallaren Jon DeVries Jo Henderson Jesse Solomon John Sayles
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading