; Editor die and the Cruisers is a mish-mash of a film, combining elements of the ongoing nostalgia for rock music of previous decades with an unworkable and laughable mystery plotline.

; Editor die and the Cruisers is a mish-mash of a film, combining elements of the ongoing nostalgia for rock music of previous decades with an unworkable and laughable mystery plotline.

; Editor die opens in strict Citizen Kane fashion as TV news mag reporter Maggie Foley (Ellen Barkin) is using old clips to pitch her investigative story on the early 1960s rock group Eddie and The Cruisers. Unit disbanded in 1964 with the suicide of its leader Eddie Wilson (Michael Pare).

She needs a news hook, and settles on the unlikely gimmick that Eddie (whose body was never found) is still alive and that a search for the missing tapes of his final, unreleased recording session will solve the mystery of his disappearance.

Foley interviews other surviving group members, including the lyricist-keyboard man Frank Ridgeway (Tom Berenger), who is prompted to remember (in frequent flashbacks) those glory days of 1962-63.

Under Martin Davidson’s tedious direction (he also coscripted with his sister Arlene), ed die only comes alive during the flashbacks when John Cafferty’s songs provide a showcase for the magnetic screen presences of Pare and Helen Schneider. Real life rock singer Schneider is very sexy on screen, but her contemporary scenes are ruined by unplayable dialog.

Eddie and the Cruisers

Production

Aurora. Director Martin Davidson; Producer Joseph Brooks, Robert K. Lifton; Screenplay Martin Davidson, Arlene Davidson; Camera Fred Murphy; Editor Priscilla Nedd; Music John Cafferty; Art Director Gary Weist

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1983. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

Tom Berenger Michael Pare Joe Pantoliano Matthew Laurance Helen Schneider Ellen Barkin
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