Review: ‘Born in Flames’

Lizzie Borden's 16mm independent production, which took some two years to complete, appears to have all the advantages and the disadvantages of a home movie. It is impertinent, audacious, abounding in fresh ideas, considerably untraditional ideas. On the other hand, it is disjointed, with no real characters, preachy, the script unsufficiently developed and the acting often amateurish.

Lizzie Borden’s 16mm independent production, which took some two years to complete, appears to have all the advantages and the disadvantages of a home movie. It is impertinent, audacious, abounding in fresh ideas, considerably untraditional ideas. On the other hand, it is disjointed, with no real characters, preachy, the script unsufficiently developed and the acting often amateurish.

Situated in the near future after America has gone through a socialist revolution which has turned it into a sort of one-party progressive democracy, the story deals with the condition of women in that new society, conditions that, in Borden’s opinion, changed very little from those prevalent today.

Borden shows how the extremists are proven right, and how such a revolution should be prepared in future.

The film’s main grace is its sense of humor, a rare quality indeed in a militant film. Nervously edited, it has an almost documentary touch in the use of the camera on real New York locations, and a powerful beat soundtrack.

Born in Flames

Production

Jerome Foundation. Director Lizzie Borden; Producer Lizzie Borden; Screenplay Lizzie Borden; Camera Ed Bowes, Al Santana, Phil O'Reilly; Editor Lizzie Borden; Music The Bloods, The Red Crayolas, Ibis

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1983. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Honey Jeanne Satterfield Adele Bertel Becky Johnson Pat Murphy Kathy Bigelow
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