Review: ‘10 to Midnight’

A sexually deranged killer slices up five young women like melons. The killer (well enough played by Gene Davis) is literally getting away with murder because of bureaucratic red tape and a pending insanity plea. As cop Charles Bronson puts it: 'I remember when legal meant lawful. Now it means loophole'. So Bronson takes matters into his own hands.

A sexually deranged killer slices up five young women like melons. The killer (well enough played by Gene Davis) is literally getting away with murder because of bureaucratic red tape and a pending insanity plea. As cop Charles Bronson puts it: ‘I remember when legal meant lawful. Now it means loophole’. So Bronson takes matters into his own hands.

William Roberts’ screenplay, while it sags in the middle, is damnably clever at dropping in its vicious vigilante theme without being didactic, and J. Lee Thompson’s direction, borrowing from Hitchcock’s editing in Psycho, creates the full horror of blades thrusting into naked bellies without the viewer ever actually seeing it happen.

Lisa Eilbacher plays Bronson’s daughter and the beautiful, major target of the killer. Geoffrey Lewis is very good as a self-serving defense attorney who tells his warped client to be cool because ‘you’ll walk out of a crazy house alive’.

10 to Midnight

Production

Golan-Globus/City. Director J. Lee Thompson; Producer Pancho Kohner, Lance Hool; Screenplay William Roberts; Camera Adam Greenberg; Editor Peter Lee-Thompson; Music Robert O. Ragland; Art Director Jim Freiburger

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1983. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

Charles Bronson Lisa Eilbacher Gene Davis Andrew Stevens Geoffrey Lewis Wilford Brimley
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