Combine beaucoup gore and an atrocity-a-minute action edited in fastpace style. Then, toss in a scantily clad cast of none-too- talented performers mouthing dimwitted dialog and garnish with a touch of medieval gibberish. The result would be something resembling The Sword and the Sorcerer.

Combine beaucoup gore and an atrocity-a-minute action edited in fastpace style. Then, toss in a scantily clad cast of none-too- talented performers mouthing dimwitted dialog and garnish with a touch of medieval gibberish. The result would be something resembling The Sword and the Sorcerer.

The plot is needlessly complicated by a truly lackluster script. Stripped to essentials, which the cast often does in this pseudo epic, Sword is about the retaking by a group of rag-tag medievalists of a once peaceable kingdom sadistically ruled by an evil knight named Cromwell.

Lee Horsley grins a lot as the leader of the rebels, who turns out to be the long-banished son of the old and virtuous king. Simon MacCorkindale grimaces a good deal as a royal pretender.

For trivia fans, Nina Van Pallandt plays the good queen who’s dispatched quickly and mercifully since her performance is nothing to boast of.

The Sword and the Sorcerer

Production

Chase. Director Albert Pyun; Producer Brandon Chase, Marianne Chase, Tom Karnowski,; Screenplay Albert Pyun, Tom Karnowski, John Stuckmeyer; Camera Joseph Mangine; Editor Marshall Harvey; Music David Whitaker; Art Director George Costello

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1982. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

Lee Horsley Kathleen Beller Simon MacCorkindale George Maharis Richard Lynch Nina Van Pallandt
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