For Your Eyes Only bears not the slightest resemblance to the Ian Fleming novel of the same title, but emerges as one of the most thoroughly enjoyable of the 12 Bond pix [to date] despite fact that many of the usual ingredients in the successful 007 formula are missing.

For Your Eyes Only bears not the slightest resemblance to the Ian Fleming novel of the same title, but emerges as one of the most thoroughly enjoyable of the 12 Bond pix [to date] despite fact that many of the usual ingredients in the successful 007 formula are missing.

The film is probably the best-directed on all levels since On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, as John Glen, moving into the director’s chair after long service as second unit director and editor, displays a fine eye.

Story also benefits from presence of a truly sympathetic heroine, fetchingly portrayed by Carole Bouquet, who exhibits a humanity and emotionalism not frequently found in this sort of pop adventure and who takes a long time (the entire picture, in fact) to jump into the sack with him.

M is gone, due to Bernard Lee’s death; Bond doesn’t make his first feminine conquest until halfway through the picture; there’s no technology introduced by Q which saves the hero in the end; no looming supervillain dominates the drama; Bond bon mots are surprisingly sparse, and the fate of the whole world isn’t even hanging in the balance at the climax.

1981: Nomination: Best Song (‘For Your Eyes Only’)

For Your Eyes Only

UK

Production

United Artists/Eon. Director John Glen; Producer Albert R. Broccoli; Screenplay Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson; Camera Alan Hume; Editor John Grover; Music Bill Conti; Art Director Peter Lamont

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1981. Running time: 127 MIN.

With

Roger Moore Carole Bouquet Topol Jill Bennett Lois Maxwell Lynn-Holly Johnson
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