This is not a sequel to the 1961 hit, Guns of Navarone, although Force 10 opens with the bangup conclusion of the earlier exercise in World War II commando heroics.

This is not a sequel to the 1961 hit, Guns of Navarone, although Force 10 opens with the bangup conclusion of the earlier exercise in World War II commando heroics.

Two survivors of the spiking of the guns, British Major Mallory (now played by Robert Shaw) and demolitions expert Miller (Edward Fox) provide the link that gives some purpose to the title [from the novel by Alistair MacLean; screen story by Carl Foreman].

Director Guy Hamilton manages over the course of almost two hours to keep his audience on edge. For a finale he has a double whammy destruction of a giant Yugoslav dam which sets loose forces of nature that crumble a seemingly indestructible bridge.

This next-to-last film appearance of Robert Shaw is not his glory farewell. He is very good in what he is called upon to do, but the role is not one that makes any particular demand upon an exceptionally talented person.

Harrison Ford does a creditable job as the American Colonel; Fox is excellent as the British demolitions expert; Carl Weathers gives a powerful performance as the unwanted black GI who proves himself in more ways than one. Barbara Bach, lone femme, does fine in a tragic, patriotic role as a Partisan. Franco Nero as a Nazi double agent who fools the Partisans is slickly nefarious.

Force 10 from Navarone

UK

Production

Navarone. Director Guy Hamilton; Producer Oliver A. Unger; Screenplay Robin Chapman; Camera Christopher Challis; Editor Raymond Poulton; Music Ron Goodwin; Art Director Geoffrey Drake

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1978. Running time: 118 MIN.

With

Robert Shaw Harrison Ford Edward Fox Barbara Bach Franco Nero Richard Kiel
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