Review: ‘Welcome to L.A.’

The banal point of Welcome to L.A. is pretty much summed up in the closing song by Richard Baskin, in which Keith Carradine sings of the city 'where the air is thick and yellow with the stale taste of decay'. The film has a studied, calculated, over-designed look that drains the vitality from the cast as director Alan Rudolph puts them through their predictable paces in a Nashville-like amorphous story which has something to do with the music industry.

The banal point of Welcome to L.A. is pretty much summed up in the closing song by Richard Baskin, in which Keith Carradine sings of the city ‘where the air is thick and yellow with the stale taste of decay’. The film has a studied, calculated, over-designed look that drains the vitality from the cast as director Alan Rudolph puts them through their predictable paces in a Nashville-like amorphous story which has something to do with the music industry.

Welcome to L.A. has lots of aimless driving around town, gloomy sex encounters, mumbled dialog, and showy camera movements.

Carradine sings a few songs, guzzles booze without feeling it, and exerts a mysterious attraction on every woman in sight.

Welcome to L.A.

Production

United Artists. Director Alan Rudolph; Producer Robert Altman; Screenplay Alan Rudolph; Camera Dave Myers; Editor William A. Sawyer, Tom Walls; Music Richard Baskin

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1976. Running time: 103 MIN.

With

Keith Carradine Sally Kellerman Geraldine Chaplin Harvey Keitel Lauren Hutton Viveca Lindfors
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