Review: ‘The Slipper and the Rose – The Story of Cinderella’

What script has managed to do so surprisingly well is first of all to modernize the classic Cinderella tale, making it entertaining and (almost) believable for adults while preserving basic pattern and texture of the original for the youngsters.

What script has managed to do so surprisingly well is first of all to modernize the classic Cinderella tale, making it entertaining and (almost) believable for adults while preserving basic pattern and texture of the original for the youngsters.

Richard Chamberlain makes a believable, feet-on-the-ground Prince, Gemma Craven is a pretty and very effective Cinderella.

Michael Hordern steals many a scene as the king, in a very good performance; Kenneth More has great moments as the chamberlain; while Edith Evans thefts the scenes she’s in with some irresistible windup oneliners.

Physical facets, from eye-popping Pinewood Studio sets to the lushly romantic Austrian exteriors, are standout.

1977: Nomination: Best Adapted Score, Song

The Slipper and the Rose - The Story of Cinderella

UK

Production

Paradine. Director Bryan Forbes; Producer Stuart Lyons; Screenplay Bryan Forbes, Richard M. Sherman, Robert B. Sherman; Camera Tony Imi; Editor Timothy Gee; Music Richard M. Sherman, Robert B. Sherman; Art Director Raymond Simm

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1976. Running time: 146 MIN.

With

Richard Chamberlain Gemma Craven Annette Crosbie Edith Evans Christopher Gable Michael Hordern
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