Review: ‘Vampira’

David Niven goes the way of Vincent Price in Vampira. Screenplay is set in the present day, and has Dracula reading Playboy, sleeping in an automated coffin, and giving tours of his castle as a means of luring fresh victims.

David Niven goes the way of Vincent Price in Vampira. Screenplay is set in the present day, and has Dracula reading Playboy, sleeping in an automated coffin, and giving tours of his castle as a means of luring fresh victims.

Niven smoothly incarnates the old-style rake, while magazine writer Nicky Henson, one of his victims, repellently typifies the hip young stud.

All of this might have made a good high-comedy satire, instead of sporadically amusing camp, if the dialog were sharper and if the plot didn’t revolve around Niven’s attempts to revive his long-dead mate Vampira, played witlessly by Teresa Graves.

Vampira

UK

Production

World. Director Clive Donner; Producer Jack H. Wiener; Screenplay Jeremy Lloyd; Camera Tony Richmond; Editor Bill Butler; Music David Whittaker; Art Director Phillip Harrison

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1975. Running time: 89 MIN.

With

David Niven Teresa Groves Peter Bayliss Jennie Linden Nicky Henson Linda Hayden
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